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19 results for Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861:
Cartoon, Liberty, the Fair Maid of Kansas in the Hands of the Border Ruffians
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: Undated
This cartoon depicts William L. Marcy, James Buchanan, Franklin Pierce, Lewis Cass, and Stephen Douglas harassing Liberty, the representation of Kansas Territory. A former U.S. senator from New York, Marcy was a leader of the conservative Democrats, with pro-Southern leanings much like those of presidents Pierce and Buchanan; Marcy served as secretary of war (1845-1849) under James K. Polk and secretary of state (1853-1857) under President Pierce, during the worst of the Kansas troubles.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Cartoons; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Political cartoons


Letter, M. [Martin] F. Conway to F. [Franklin] B. Sanborn
Authors: Conway, Martin Franklin
Date: November 16, 1857
Shortly before he was to leave Washington, D.C., for a return trip to the territory, Conway wrote Sanborn in Concord, Mass., about his disappointment at again being separated from his wife and child, but he focused most of his comments on the Lecompton machinations and his continued belief that the Free State Party had be wrong to participate in the territorial election (thus giving that government legitimacy).

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Conway, Martin Franklin; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Free State Party; Lecompton Constitution; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Slavery; United States. Congress


Speech of Senator Douglas, of Illinois, on the President's Message
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: December 9, 1857
Senator Stephen Douglas delivered this speech in the United States Senate, responding to President Buchanan's decision to let Congress determine whether or not to admit Kansas into the Union. Douglas approved of the decision, as he believed it was not an Executive matter. Douglas reiterated the point that the members of the Lecompton Constitutional Convention were appointed to frame a sample government, subject to the approval of the Territory's citizens, not to make a government themselves. Although he disapproved of the means used to submit the Lecompton Constitution to Congress, Douglas judged that the free state government in Topeka was an unlawful legislative body.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election fraud; Free state legislature; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Missouri compromise; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dr Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 10, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent dramatic political events. Marcus referred to Democrat Stephen Douglas' "breaking" with President Buchanan. Both men supported popular sovereignty in Kansas, as well as the solidarity of the Union. However, the President, unwilling to override the work of what he considered a legitimate Lecompton Constitutional Convention or to cancel a local election result, asked Congress to approve the Lecompton Constitution, make Kansas momentarily a slave state, and thus enable the people there to make any new constitution they wished. But Douglas, outraged by such a distortion of his vision of popular sovereignty , broke with Buchanan and joined with the Republicans to defeat the admission of Kansas.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio, regarding Congress' apparent lack of efficiency, acting as a "circumlocution office", in which little is accomplished in the way of policy-making towards resolution of the Kansas question. Marcus described his private interview with President Buchanan, who did not seem to impress him, and mentioned that the President's party [Democratic] seemed to be "thinning" in the South.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Davis, Jefferson; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Wm. Stanley to Dear [John A.] Halderman
Authors: Stanley, William
Date: January 12, 1858
Shortly after Halderman left Leavenworth for a trip east (Washington, D. C., it is nearly certain), William Stanley wrote him from Leavenworth regarding some "excitement" that had occurred there the very day Halderman left. Many were fearful of "attack" and thus the alarms were "sounded. . . . Hundreds of free state men were soon in arms, and the proslavery party exhibited more of apprehension than I have ever witnessed before." He mentions proslavery men leaving for Shawnee, the fact that many free-state men had recently been driven out of nearby Kickapoo, that John Calhoun was given a military escort to Lecompton, and his confidence that the [Lecompton] constitution would pass the Congress.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Free state; Free state militia; Halderman, John Adams; Kickapoo, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Proslavery; Stanley, William


Letter, S. T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar E. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: January 14, 1858
Writing from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son Oscar Learnard, S. T. Learnard claimed he was still planning to travel to Kansas Territory, and he asked about his son's affairs in Burlington. Learnard also focused on political attitudes in the East and mentioned Stephen Douglas' "speech on Kansas affairs" (Lecompton Constitution), which had caused "our Bogus democrats" to draw in "their horns." Many Democrats, he insisted, were still "ready to do any dirty work the slave power wish them to do."

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Bakersfield, Vermont; Burlington, Kansas Territory; Coffey County, Kansas Territory; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Northern Democratic Party; Slave power


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: January 14, 1858
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, VT, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. The author mentioned various friends and relatives, several of whom had traveled to and settled in Kansas Territory. He reiterated his desire to move his family to Kansas Territory as well. S.T. also communicated his disgust with the Democrats, who "are chained to the car of slavery and are ready to do any dirty work the slave power wish them to do."

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Daily life; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Emigration and immigration; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; National politics; Vermont; Weather


Minority Report of Senator Douglas of Illinios on the Kansas-Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: February 18, 1858
Senator Stephen Douglas, as a member of the Committee on the Territories, presented this report, which analyzed the Lecompton and Topeka constitutional rivalry, for the consideration of the President. Douglas found that, under the Kansas-Nebraska Act, no government of Kansas, Territorial or otherwise, had the power to draft any constitution without the intital consent of Congress; the territories, though "self-governed" were not sovereign entities, and still were to defer to the direction of the federal government. He argued that even the recognized territorial government had no right to convene a constitutional convention without Congressional approval, and the vote the Lecompton Convention presented to the people offered no opportunity to fully reject the Lecompton Constitution, but only to accept or reject the slavery provision; a person could not vote against making Kansas a slave state unless he was also willing to vote for the Lecompton Constitution. Douglas, however, in his report likened this unauthorized act of Lecompton Constitutional Convention as much "revolution" and "treasonable pertinacity" as those actions of the free state government in Topeka; neither group held legitimate authority to draft or present their constitutions.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Free state legislature; Illinois; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Agreement, Articles of agreement made . . .
Authors: Halderman, John Adams
Date: April 30, 1858
Dated April 30, 1858, and executed in Leavenworth, this handwritten document was an "agreement made and entered into" by John Adams Halderman and Hugh Ewing, representing the Leavenworth Journal, and C. H. McLaughlin and William B. Hutchison to lease all the newspaper equipment for $25 per month. Among other more technically oriented conditions of the lease pertaining to the upkeep of the business, McLaughlin and Hutchinson agreed "to make it a free-state Democratic paper, sustaining the ___ ___ course of Senator Douglas . . ."

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Ewing, Hugh; Free state Democrats; Halderman, John Adams; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Leavenworth Journal; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; McLaughlin, C. H.; Newspapers


Lombard Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
Students of Lombard College at Galesburg, Illinois, presented this banner to Abraham Lincoln on October 7, 1858. Lincoln's fifth debate with Stephen A. Douglas was held at Galesburg that evening. Lincoln later presented the banner to Mark W. Delahay of Leavenworth, who was related to Lincoln by marriage. Delahay used the banner in the 1860 presidential election.

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Elections; Flags and banners; Illinois; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lombard College; Objects


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 11, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus told his brother of his experience in Washington: "awfully dull, nothing like an exciting party or an interesting debate thus far". He discussed to his social life and upcoming trips to Cuba, and also to Boston to meet with the Directors of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Marcus did elaborate on one message that had been clearly communicated to him in the House: that opponents of the "Lecompton party" were not encouraged to unite.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Ewing, Hugh Boyle; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; United States. Congress. House; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter, A. Lincoln (copy) to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Lincoln, Abraham
Date: May 14, 1859
This two-page, handwritten copy of a letter to Mark Delahay from Abraham Lincoln was probably given to the KSHS by Delahay's daughter Mary E. Delahay in the early 1900s. Lincoln regretfully declined an invitation to attend the Osawatomie convention on May 18 which was to formally organize the Republican Party in Kansas. Lincoln warned against "the temptation to lower the Republican Standard [in whatever platform the convention might adopt] in order to gather recruits. In my judgment," Lincoln continued," such a step would be a serious mistake" that "would surrender the object of the Republican organization--the preventing the Spread and Nationalization of Slaver . . ."

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Slave power; Slavery


Letter, Olin Thurston to Friend [John A.] Halderman
Authors: Thurston, Olin
Date: December 30, 1859
Olin Thurston of Humbolt, Kansas, wrote J. A. Halderman to comment on the past election for state offices, to thank him for "your gallant fight in behalf of the Democracy, and to assure him that "we of southern Kansas are always ready to co-operate with our friends in Leavenworth."

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, State Officials, December 1859; Halderman, John Adams; Humboldt, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Thurston, Olin


Letter, R. S. Stevens to S. N. Wood
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 2, 1860
R. S. Stevens, a Democratic attorney who had a variety of financial interests in Kansas during the 1850s and 1860s, wrote this letter to Wood from Washington, D.C., where he (Stevens) seemed to be lobbying for a number of concessions for himself and Kansas Territory. Specifically, he wrote of mail routes and "grants for R Rr" [railroads], which would not be forthcoming because of the Republicans who "care[d] nothing about us [Kansas] except so far as political capital can be made." Much of the letter is a condemnation of the Republican Party, which he also wrote was holding up Kansas admission so it could be used against the Democrats, and the final page addressed action, or inaction, with regard to Indian treaties and land.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic National Convention (1860 : Charleston, S.C.); Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Indian lands; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Railroads; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Stevens, Robert S.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte Constitution


Letter, Findley Patterson to John A. Halderman
Authors: Patterson, Findlay
Date: April 4, 1860
Patterson, the land office receiver at Junction City, May 1858 to April 1861, wrote with regard to problems within the Kansas Democratic Party. Recent differences between members over participation in the party's national convention at Charleston, S.C., had been aired in the press, and Patterson thought this unfortunate since "the future prosperity of our country depends upon the success of that party. Democrats should, he contended, not let relatively small policy issues overshadow the fundamental principles they share. Patterson pledged his support for the nominee of the convention, whomever it was, but favored "Judge Douglass [Stephen Douglas] . . .as we have been intimate personal, as well as political friends for several years."

Keywords: Davis County, Kansas Territory; Democratic National Convention (1860 : Charleston, S.C.); Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Geary County, Kansas; Halderman, John Adams; Junction City, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Patterson, Findlay; United States. General Land Office


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Charley [Charley Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: May 1, 1860
In a letter to Charley Ewing, his younger brother, Thomas Ewing made some interesting observations about national presidential politics and parties. He was hopeful that the Republican Party in convention at Chicago would nominate a good "National man," but if they didn't he would "hope for the election of [Stephen A.] Douglas."

Keywords: Charleston, South Carolina; Chicago, Illinois; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Ewing, Charles; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Political conventions; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Whig Party (U.S.)


Photograph, Stephen A. Douglas
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Stephen A. Douglas introduced a bill which created the two territories of Kansas and Nebraska. The bill specifically repealed the Missouri compromise of 1820. The Kansas-Nebraska bill called for the use of "popular sovereignty" which allowed voters to decide for themselves whether or not slavery would be allowed in the territories.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Kansas Nebraska Act; Popular sovereignty


Portrait, Stephen Douglas
Authors: Lussier, Louis
Date: 
Portrait of Stephen Douglas by Louis Lussier. Douglas helped write the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which called for the repeal of the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Kansas and Nebraska were opened up for settlement but the people living there, not the national government, would determine whether these states would be free or slave. Douglas had been a member of Congress and a United States Senator from Illinois from 1847 until his death in 1861. He ran for President, unsuccessfully, against Abraham Lincoln in 1860.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lussier, Louis; Objects; Popular sovereignty


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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