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4 results for Divorce:
Displaying results:1-4
Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Mary [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 6, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday, soon to return to Topeka after a productive territorial legislative session in Lawrence, wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He wrote about a festival held at the Eldridge House, and reported on several other incidents of note: the arrest of John W. Doy, captured by Missourians while helping former slaves travel to Iowa; John Brown's avoidance of capture by [John P.] Woods (at the Battle of the Spurs on January 31, 1859); and Charles Fischer's escape after being twice arrested as "a fugitive slave." Holliday also wrote that the legislature had passed and Governor Samuel Medary would approve a bill granting Josephine Branscomb a divorce. Despite Holliday's efforts, the constitutional convention would be held at Wyandotte in July. He had refused [Alfred L.] Winans' request for a recommendation.

Keywords: Branscomb, Josephine; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Divorce; Doy, John; Fisher, Charley; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Spurs, Battle of the; Winans, A. L.; Wood, John P.; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, C. Robinson to My Dear L [Amos A. Lawrence]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 9, 1859
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson described the complicated political situation which had arisen from the development of Quindaro. Personal disagreements between Abelard Guthrie, S.N. Simpson, Joel Walker, and himself were making progress difficult. Robinson hoped that, upon their resolution, they could move forward with securing a contract with the Parkville & Grand River Railroad, as well as plans for a college. Two church groups had expressed interest in opening up their own institutions, or working with Robinson to found one. Robinson included a plat map for a prospective site, to which he did not entirely give his support; he added comments regarding the admission of women to the college, and thanked Lawrence again for his support of their enterprises.

Keywords: Churches; Divorce; Emery, James Stanley; Guthrie, Abelard; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Parkville & Grand River Railroad; Railroad companies; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town development; Universities and colleges; Walker, Joel; Women; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear John [John J. Brasee]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: May 19, 1860
Ewing wrote this letter to John J. Brasee of Lancaster, Ohio (Ewing's hometown), in response to an apparent inquiry into the grounds for and the chances of someone acquiring an easy divorce in K.T.

Keywords: Adultery; Brasee, John J.; Courts; Divorce; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Pettit, John; Wyandotte Constitution


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: January 19, 1861
In Lawrence on January 19, 1861, attending the meeting of what proved to be the last territorial legislature, Ingalls wrote about everyone's interest in happenings outside the territory: namely, congressional action on the "Kansas Admission Bill" and the "Pacific Rail Road Bill," as well as "the condition of affairs of the South ['the secession movement']. Especially bad weather--"the snow is quite deep and the temperature below zero constantly"--had left Kansas somewhat isolated, and as they waited for news the legislature was "not doing much except discussing Union resolutions, endorsing Major [Robert] Anderson [commander of U.S. troops at Fort Sumter], and divorcing Every body that applies for rupture of the bonds of matrimony."

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Anderson, Major Robert; Divorce; Divorce law and legislation; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lawrence; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Secession; Sectionalism (United States)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.