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12 results for Diseases:
Journey from Massachusetts to Kansas
Authors: Allen, Chestina Bowker
Date: October 17, 1854 - April 22, 1858
Chestina Bowker Allen traveled to Kansas Territory from Roxbury, Massachusetts, with her husband Asahel Gilbert Allen and five children--William, Charles, Henrietta, John, and Abbie. Apparently, they were members of the third company sent by the New England Emigrant Aid Company and began the journey to Kansas Territory in October, 1854. While the title indicated it recorded the journey to the territory, it actually documented their first three years in Kansas Territory. Mrs. Allen described their journey west with stops in Kansas City and Lawrence. They eventually settled near Rock Creek in Pottawatomie County. She wrote about many of her daily activities including assisting neighbors when ill. She mentioned a cholera epidemic in the area in 1855. She wrote about various rumors and encounters with free state supporters (which the Allen family was) and proslavery groups. She provided a great deal of information about living conditions and the price and availability of various goods. She wrote about her husband and older sons going to various communities to work and also about people that visited their home and those who boarded with them. She provided fairly stereotypical descriptions of Native Americans.The document appeared to be recopied from an original diary and included some penciled in corrections and a few annotations from a later time.

Keywords: Allen, Asahel Gilbert; Allen, Charles Bowker; Allen, Chestina Bowker; Allen, William Francis; American Indians (see also Native Americans); Daily life; Diaries; Diseases; Economic conditions; Ferries; Free state supporters; Louisville, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Native Americans; Pottawatomie County, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Rock Creek, Kansas Territory; Settlement; Steamboats


Letter, Tovey, R. [Robert] A. to My Dear Wife [Eliza (Matthew) Tovey]
Authors: Tovey, Robert Atkins
Date: c. 1854
Robert Atkins Tovey, Sr., an Englishman traveling to Kansas Territory, wrote to his wife Eliza (Matthew) Tovey, at their home it Albany, New York. Tovey recounted his travel experiences by steamboat and rail. Throughout, he provided detailed scenic descriptions from New York, the Great Lakes, Detroit, Illinois, St. Louis, and the Missouri River. Tovey, coming into contact with slavery on his journey, included brief commentary on the subject.

Keywords: Diseases; Medicine; Missouri River; New York; Railroads; Slavery; St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Tovey, Robert Atkins; Transportation; Travel


Letter, [Hiram Hill] to Dear Wife
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 7, 1855
Hiram Hill of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts wrote to his wife while traveling up the Missouri River from St. Louis to Kansas City. Hill was a free soil sympathizer evidentially traveling with a company of like-minded settlers, for he wrote that some steamboat passengers viewed the company with "rather suspitious eyes." Hill told his wife not to worry although one family had cholera and, on another boat, fifteen had died the previous week. The letter, written hastily in pencil, is not signed.

Keywords: Diseases; Hill, Hiram; Missouri River; Sickness (see Illness); Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Water transportation


Letter, H. Hill to Dear Brother
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: May 13, 1855
After arriving in Kansas City by steamboat, Hiram Hill wrote to his brother. En route, four men had died of cholera while others continued to drink and play cards nearby. Disease fatalities were common, Hill reported. He speculated that the river water, which passengers drank, was contaminated with disease from the rich prairie soil. Hill described life at the Winedot [sic] Indian Reservation (beginning at the bottom of page 2) where he met the "prinsable chiefe" and saw the governor's sister. Hill related news concerning Mr. Putnam, Mr. Tomas, Mr. Gague, Mr. Jay, Mr. Partridge, Mr. Whitman, Mr. Pomeroy, Mr. Fuller and others. He was skeptical that these men would permanently settle in Kansas Territory. Hill also described Kansas City, which he thought would improve under "yankee," rather than "slave holder," management. (Hill's final destination was Lawrence, where he acquired town lots through quit claims not included in this online project.)

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Burial; Diseases; Emigration and immigration; Hill, Hiram; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company; Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Weather; Wyandot Indians


Letter, Wm. E. Goodnow to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: June 10, 1855
William Goodnow, brother of Isaac Goodnow, wrote from Shannon, Wild Cat Creek, Kansas Territory, to his wife back East. Goodnow described his experiences participating in the development of the nearby town of Manhattan, having attended a city council meeting and anticipating the founding of a newspaper. Goodnow also mentioned religious services and "Sabbath Schools" currently running out of settler's homes, and commented on the numerous emigrants who had traveled to Kansas Territory only to quickly give up and return home.

Keywords: Diseases; Election fraud; Emigration and immigration; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Livestock; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Methodists; Newspapers; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Religion; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory; Town development


Letter, Wm [Goodnow] to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: June 17, 1855
William Goodnow wrote from Shannon, Wild Cat Creek, Kansas Territory, to his wife in New England. Goodnow commented on the weather and crops of the Territory, contrasting them with his experiences back East. Recovering from an illness, he had observed that there had been much traffic of soldiers, teams, and equipment passing by on their way to Fort Riley, "12 miles above here." Goodnow also mentioned that the Territorial Legislature was slated to convene at Pawnee, only 2 miles from his settlement, during the next week, though he supposed that "its doings will be illegal & void."

Keywords: Crops; Daily life; Denison, Joseph; Diseases; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Goodnow, William E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory; Weather


Letter, Wm [Goodnow] to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: July 1, 1855
William Goodnow, brother of Isaac Goodnow, wrote from Shannon, Wild Cat Creek, Kansas Territory, to his wife Harriet in New England. Goodnow described his current activities, among them serving on the Manhattan city council along with his brother. He related his experience of seeing Governor Reeder pass by on his way to Pawnee, and judged him "fully able. . .to meet any Missouri renegade." Goodnow also anticipated that the free soil members of the Territorial Legislature would resign "not acknowledging this Legislature as a constitutional one."

Keywords: Crops; Diseases; Free Soil Party; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Harriet; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Town development; Travel; Women


Letter, Mary Holliday to My Dear Husband [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: October 23, 1856
Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania, wrote to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, likely at Philadelphia. She had returned from a trip to Wooster, Ohio. She reported improved Kansas Territory conditions from one of William D. Paul's letters. Mary was eager to leave for K. T., especially since many Meadville children, including Lillie, were ill, and requested that Cyrus buy household articles. Mary reported that McFarland of Democrat James Buchanan's campaign had bribed voters. Could women vote, John C. Fremont would be elected, she declared. She enclosed a letter to free state governor William Y. Roberts and instructed him to visit Charley Ottinger.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Diseases; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Household equipment; Kansas Territory; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Paul, William D.; Roberts, William Young; Weather; Women Suffrage


Letter, C. A. Wright to Mr. H. Hill
Authors: Wright, Charles A.
Date: February 1, 1857
Charles Wright wrote from Bald Mountain, New York, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, describing his travel route from Kansas Territory to the East. Wright reported that Samuel Simpson was still in Quindaro and was doing well, but mentioned that another new town in Wyandotte was being developed; Wright believed that this new one was in a better location. He also discussed buying, selling, and the prices of town lots in Lawrence and West Lawrence, and said that construction had begun on the Free State Hotel. Wright added that a "Miss Hall" in Lawrence had begun writing a history of Kansas.

Keywords: Diseases; Free State Hotel; Hill, Hiram; New York; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town development; Town lots; Travel; Wright, Charles A.


Circular, Information for Kanzas Immigrants, 1857
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: 1857
Thomas Webb compiled this more comprehensive version of his earlier circulars by the same name. Containing much of the same information as the previous versions, such as details about the logistics of the trip to Kansas and subjects such as weather, farming, Indians, and employment, it features a large section that describes individual town settlements. This circular also addresses the proslavery and free state conflict, though in a nonpartisan manner, considering the interests of both groups.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Books; Brown, John Carter; Circulars; Crops; Diseases; Education; Food; Guns; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Libraries; Merchandise; Merchants; Native Americans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Newspapers; Religion; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Town settlement; Transportation; Travel literature; Weapons (see also Guns); Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, A. Venard, MD to Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Venard, A.
Date: October 3, 1860
This letter is from A. Venard, a medical doctor from Pleasant Grove, Kansas Territory who wrote to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter dealt with the sickness and disease that plagued the settlers along the Verdigris River in southeast Kansas. Dr. Venard had worked diligently to aid the settlers, even using funds from his own pocket to purchase medicine, but he requested that the committee give him 100 dollars worth of drugs. Attached to this letter is an itemized listing of the drugs that he would like to be purchased with those funds.

Keywords: Diseases; Health; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Medicine; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Sickness (see Illness); Vegetables; Venard, A.


Letter, Thaddeus Hyatt to James Buchanan
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: October 16, 1860
Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to the President of the United States in an effort to obtain assistance for the suffering inhabitants of Kansas. He described in detail the needs of the settlers, including their lack of adequate winter clothing and the scarcity of food. According to his personal observations, Hyatt concluded that the only options left to Kansas settlers were exodus or starvation. He also asked that all government lands be removed from the market, especially those in the New York Indian Reserve.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Diseases; Droughts; Economic conditions; Famines; Food; Health; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Indian reserves; Relief; Sickness (see Illness)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.