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35 results for Denver, James William, 1817-1892:
Photograph, James W. Denver
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: Circa 1857
James W. Denver was the seventh Territorial Governor, serving from May 12 to July 3 and July 30 through October, 1858. He also served as acting Governor from December 21, 1857 through May 12, 1858. This engraving was made while he was serving as a member of the 34th Congress from California, just prior to being appointed acting Territorial Governor.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Engravings; Photographs and Illustrations


Address to the people of Kansas
Authors: Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: December 21, 1857
Initial address from Gov. Denver indicating his instructions from the president.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Territorial politics and government


Letter, Will [James W. Denver] to My Dear Wife
Authors: Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 4, 1858
James W. Denver, governor of Kansas Territory, wrote from Lecompton, Kansas Territory to his wife. Denver mentioned the January 4, 1858 election on the Lecompton Constitution. He described the tendency of Kansas Territory residents to exaggerate claims of violence, his general dislike of Kansas, and his desire to leave the territory as soon as possible.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Denver, Louisa; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Propaganda


Report on the result of the vote of Dec. 21, 1857 and Jan. 4, 1858 including proclamation on the official vote by acting Gov. Denver, Jan. 14, 1858
Authors: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 14, 1858


Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Elections; Lecompton Constitution


Report of the President of the Council and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas, on the result of the vote of December 21st for the Lecompton Constitution, and on the result of the election of Januray 4th under said Constitution.
Authors: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 14, 1858
This printed document reported the votes on the Lecompton Constitution from elections held on December 21, 1857, and January 4, 1858. It was prepared by G. W. Deitzler, Speaker of the House and C. W. Babcock, president of the Council of the territorial legislature. The vote showed a majority of 5,574 for the constitution with slavery but 3,012 of those votes came from areas the authors felt were sparsely settled and thus indicated fraudulent votes. The same charges of fraud applied to the election for state officials, though the free state candidates claimed a small majority in all races. The results of the vote on the Lecompton Constitution on January 4, 1858, showed a majority of 10,000 against the Lecompton Constitution as presented in a proclamation from J. W. Denver, Secretary and Acting Governor.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Elections; Free state activities; Free state supporters; Lecompton Constitution; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters


Letter, John T. Jones to Hon. J. W. Denver
Authors: Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy)
Date: January 16, 1858
John T. Jones, an interpreter for the Ottawa Indians, wrote from Washington urging Governor James W. Denver to provide his support for ratification of a treaty between the U.S. government and the Ottawas. Jones reported that the Secretary of the Interior was not inclined to support ratification and he believed Denver, who had negotiated the treaty with the Ottawas during his tenure as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, could influence the decision.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Native Americans; Ottawa Indians; Treaties


Letter, J. Thompson to My Dear [James W.] Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: January 29, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to James W. Denver from the U. S. Department of the Interior regarding the current debate over the Lecompton Constitution. Thompson advised Denver to stand his ground in support of it, regardless of what the President might say; "to turn aside now is downright weakness" and a show of cowardice. Thompson's opinion was that a Territorial decision to abolish slavery would be against the Dred Scott decision, and therefore unconstitutional.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; Dred Scott decision; Elmore, Rush; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Proslavery perspective; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, William Franklin Johns to Dear Uncle [J. W. Denver]
Authors: Denver, Mary C. ; Johns, William Franklin
Date: February 7, 1858
Williams Franklin Johns wrote from Wilmington, Ohio, to his uncle, James William Denver, who was "Acting Governor" in Kansas Territory. Johns told his uncle about his recent return to school and of his desire to travel to Lecompton. He also recounted the comments of a family friend, Mr. Creamer, who made Kanzas sound like an "awful place" full of villianous "Yanks" who should be swept out. The last page is a short letter from Mary C. Denver, which contained news of family and friends, but also included commentary about Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Denver, Mary C.; Education; Emigration and immigration; Johns, William Franklin; Ohio; Proslavery supporters


Letter, Lucian J. Eastin to My Dear Sir [Gov. James Denver]
Authors: Eastin, Lucian J.
Date: February 20, 1858
Lucian J. Eastin, a proslavery supporter and editor of the Herald in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, wrote to Governor James Denver praising him for his efforts and congratulating him for his successes. Eastin told Denver that he feared the Lecompton Constitution would not pass, and he referred to recent incidents of election fraud. He also requested money from Denver so that he could print Denver's recent address and proclamation to the Kansas people.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Eastin, Lucian J.; Economic conditions; Election fraud; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Newspapers; Proslavery supporters; United States. Congress


Letter, T. J. Robinson to Governor [James W. Denver]
Authors: Robinson, Thomas J.
Date: March 3, 1858
Thomas J. Robinson, writing from Washington D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, speculated that Kansas would be admitted as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Robinson suggested that Denver's future political prospects would improve from such an occurrence.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Herndon, Lou; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Thomas J.; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Town promotion


Letter, Jo. P. Vaughn to Genl. [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Vaughn, John P.
Date: March 4, 1858
John P. Vaughn, writing from Sacramento, California to Governor James W. Denver, about his efforts to get the California legislature to support Kansas' admission as a state under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Vaughn, John P.


Letter, J. H. Noteware to His Excellency Gov. [James W.] Denver
Authors: Noteware, James H.
Date: March 5, 1858
James H. Noteware, superintendent of schools for Kansas Territory, wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver seeking the governor's support for his effort to establish a school system in the territory.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Education; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Noteware, James H.; Schools


Letter, H. J. Marshall to Governor [James] Denver
Authors: Marshall, H.J.
Date: March 15, 1858
H. J. Marshall wrote from Washington, D. C. to Governor Denver regarding recent Congressional proceedings. Marshall supposed that the Lecompton Constitution would be defeated, and that the election returns of the past January 4 would be thrown out due to fraudulent activities. He also expressed the majority support for Denver's proclamation of February 26, which denied James Lane's authority to organize the territorial militia, and "show[ed] the base conduct of the same and his party of out-laws."

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election fraud; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Marshall, H.J.; United States. Congress


Letter, Brad [A. G. Bradford] to [Governor James H.] Denver
Authors: Bradford, A. G.
Date: March 18, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James H. Denver, suggested that the effort to admit Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution likely would fail in the U.S. Congress. Bradford also sought Denver's support for his attempt to receive an appointment as Superintendent of Indian Affairs and commented upon Denver's future political opportunities in California.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bradford, A. G.; Calhoun, John; California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Patronage, political; Washington, D.C.


Letter, R. S. Stevens to J. W. Denver
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 3, 1858
Robert S. Stevens, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported upon the U.S. House of Representative's passage of the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, which proposed to resubmit the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. While Stevens, and by implication Denver, supported the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, he contended that it was in the Democratic Party's best interests for Kansas to be admitted under the Lecompton Constitution. Stevens also commented on his efforts to get New York Indian lands in Kansas opened to preemption.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Land sales; Lecompton Constitution; Native Americans; New York Indian Reserve; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Congress


Letter, Thos. A Hendricks to Dear Sir [Gov. James W. Denver]
Authors: Hendricks, Thomas A.
Date: April 3, 1858
Thomas Hendricks wrote from Washington D. C. to Governor James Denver in Lecompton, Kansas Territory, providing his reaction to news of recent events in Kansas Territory. Hendricks referred to James Lane's duel challenge to Denver, and advised Denver to "give him a thrashing" should he have trouble with Lane again. Hendricks expressed his wish that the "Kansas question" should be resolved as soon as possible, and he speculated on the outcome of the bill in Congress which proposed the recognition of the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Brindle, William; Crittenden Amendment; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Hendricks, Thomas A.; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; United States. Congress


Letter, E. B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 13, 1858
Whitman wrote a rather lengthy update on the Kansas situation for Stearns, focusing on the political machinations of the previous few and the uncertain situation created by the Lecompton debate. Of territorial leadership, Whitman observed: "While Kansas is blessed with many of the truest men of the age, men who are fully up to the emergency, she is also cursed with some of the most unprincipled demagogues that ever afflicted any country." There was much confusion and disagreement about the best course of action for free state men to take, now that many acknowledge the death of the Topeka movement. He then turned to the work of the Minneola/Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March 1858.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); United States. Congress; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, R. S. Stevens to Hon. J. W. Denver
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 14, 1858
Robert S. Stevens wrote from Washington, D.C. to James W. Denver, governor of Kansas, discussing manners of obtaining and using certain Indian lands. Stevens had been in contact with Charles Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, in order to understand the existing agreements between the government and the various tribes. He pressed Governor Denver to make a treaty with the Delaware and Pottawatomie tribes to get control of their lands before the end of the current legislative session, which would allow him to present and get approval for any necessary bills relating to the lands in a shorter amount of time.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Mix, Charles E.; Native Americans; Pottawatomi Indians; Railroad companies; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, R. S. Stevens to My Dear Sir [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 25, 1858
Robert S. Stevens, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported that Congress had passed the English Bill, which essentially resubmitted the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Stevens predicted that Kansans would vote against it and that Kansas' admission as a state would be delayed until at least 1860. Stevens commented that legislators in Washington failed to understand "the real situation in Kansas," particularly the strength of the antislavery group in the territory.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; English Bill; Lecompton Constitution; Popular sovereignty; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Congress


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Geo. L. Stearns Esq.
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 30, 1858
Whitman's April 30, 1858, letter to Stearns described the harmonious work conducted by the "State Convention" and its nomination of state officers under the Leavenworth Constitution. That movement, he told Stearns, would probably not "amount to much if the Lecompton Constitution is rejected. He also mentioned continued tension in Bourbon County and the route of U.S. troops by "the free State boys" of Fort Scott.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free State Convention; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitution; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Army; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, J. Williams to Governor [James W.] Denver
Authors: Williams, J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Williams, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, complained about the activities of James Montgomery and "his murderers & robbers" in Bourbon County. Williams, who displayed moderate views, condemned both proslavery and free state violence and maintained that the citizens of Bourbon County simply wanted to live in peace.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Griffith, William Riley; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Violence; Williams, J.


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to General [James W. Denver]
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: May 16, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported that conditions were peaceful in the southeast section of the territory. Smith stated that he had accompanied a group of dragoons on an unsuccessful mission to find and arrest James Montgomery and other free state supporters who allegedly had engaged in violent activities in the area. Smith commented that in his view the "ultra Pro Slavery party" was partly responsible for the unrest in southeast Kansas Territory, but he also believed that "moderate free state" supporters should act to stop the violence.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; Smith, H. P. A.; United States. Army; Violence


Letter, Th. [Thomas] J. Wood, Capt. Cavalry, Comdg. to Govr. J. W. Denver
Authors: Wood, Thomas J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Captain Thomas J. Wood, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on the efforts of the U.S. Army to maintain order in southeast Kansas Territory. Capt. Wood stated that he planned to remove all troops from Fort Scott except a section of artillery and he suggested that there was no need to keep any troops in the area. The Marais des Cygnes massacre took place in Linn County on May 19, 1858, three days after Wood wrote this letter.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Military; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; United States. Army; Wood, Thomas J.


Letter, Geo. W. Clarke to Saml. J. Jones
Authors: Clarke, George W.
Date: June 2, 1858
George W. Clarke, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Samuel J. Jones (Sheriff Jones), described a May 30, 1858 incident in which Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker attempted to arrest him as a suspect in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Clarke declared that he was innocent of the charges and viewed Walker's arrest warrant as a "bogus writ." Clarke initially resisted arrest but claimed that he agreed to surrender to Lieutenant Shinn of the U.S. Army to prevent violence between Fort Scott residents and Walker's men. Clarke also described the unsuccessful efforts of angry Fort Scott residents to convince Walker to arrest James Montgomery.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamelton, Charles A.; Jayhawkers; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; United States. Army; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to Jas. W. Denver
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: June 3, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on events of May 30, 1858 involving Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker's attempt to arrest George W. Clarke on charges that Clarke participated in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Smith questioned Walker's authority to arrest Clarke, observing that Walker's arrest warrant had been issued by a justice of the peace from a township, Mapleton, that did not yet exist. Smith commented on the general state of unrest in the area and declared that the "County is in fact in open rebellion . . . . complete anarchy prevails." He encouraged Governor Denver to come to Fort Scott to assess the situation for himself and to help restore order.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Smith, H. P. A.; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, M. F. Conway to My dear Sir [George L. Stearns]
Authors: Conway, Martin Franklin
Date: June 13, 1858
Somewhat disturbed that Stearns of Boston had published his (Conway's) letter regarding "money for the Leavenworth Constitution," Martin F. Conway, Lawrence, wrote to say that there was nothing "improper or dishonorable in this transaction" and went on to reflect on the nature of the Free State Party/movement at that time. Charles Robinson was "at work to destroy the influence of the Republican wing of the Free State Party," but people back East should not conclude "that the bottom is going to fall out of Kansas because there is division in the Free State Party." Conway expected both Robinson and James H. Lane to fall from prominence because of changing circumstances in Kansas.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Free State Party; Free state cause; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Letter, J. Thompson to His Excellency J. W. Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: June 21, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to his friend, James W. Denver, from the U.S. Department of the Interior regarding Denver's service as governor of Kansas Territory. Thompson briefly discussed possible candidates for appointment to the Kansas Agency, then proceeded to praise Denver at length for his good leadership of Kansas Territory, and he assured him that he had national support for his efforts. Thompson told Denver that the among the States, their party was divided over the Lecompton Constitution, but he hoped that the English Bill would allow that Constitution to be voted on again.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; English Bill; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Mix, Charles E.; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, J. Thompson to J. W. Denver
Authors: Thompson, J.
Date: October 10, 1858
Thompson, writing from the Department of Interior in Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, urged Denver to remain in the position of territorial governor as a service to the Buchanan Administration and the Democratic party. Thompson indicated that President Buchanan believed Denver could prevent Kansas from seeking admission to the union until it had "the requisite population." Denver, in spite of Thompson's appeal, left office on October 10, 1858.

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Kansas Territory. Governor; Thompson, J.


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to James W. Denver
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: October 15, 1858
Hugh S. Walsh, Secretary under Governor Denver, now Acting Governor, wrote from Lecompton, Kansas Territory to James W. Denver in Wilmington, Ohio. Only days earlier Denver ended his term as governor of Kansas Territory. Walsh updated him on political events occurring in Kansas Territory. He also mentioned that a delegate convention planned to meet at Lawrence on November 10, and that he would do what he could to "clog" the convention until there is a "fair apportionment [of representatives] based on population" to avoid any independent actions taken on the part of free state supporters.

Keywords: Apportionment; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Newspapers; Proslavery support; Roberts, William Young; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to Dear Governor [James Denver]
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: October 28, 1858
Hugh S. Walsh, Acting Governor of Kansas Territory, wrote to former Governor James Denver regarding recent political events. The first part relates incidents arising from the mishandling of prisoners by Marshals Robbins and Walker, who had arrested and imprisoned them, leaving them "without a bailiff or any charge whatever." The second part discusses political strategies for appeasing some free state party members in order to win their support. Among those, Walsh proposes that a Kentuckian man become the next governor and that during the Democratic Convention of November 25 they adopt the Cincinnati Platform, which would uphold popular sovereignty in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Cincinnati Platform; Coffey County, Kansas Territory; Davis, Alson C.; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Elmore, Rush; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Sykes, T.B.; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to General [James W. Denver]
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: November 22, 1858
Acting Governor Hugh S. Walsh, writing from Lecompton, Kansas Territory to former territorial governor James W. Denver, described his strategy for the upcoming session of the territorial legislature. Walsh expressed the opinion that the legislature, due to voting irregularities, was not truly representative of the people of the territory. He hoped to convince the legislators to resign and call for new elections.

Keywords: Census; Courts; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election fraud; Elections; Kansas Territory. Governor; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 19, 1858
The focus of this letter from Lawrence to Robinson in Washington, D.C., was the effort underway in Lawrence and Douglas County to attract a railroad and to have it built south of the Kansas River. Leavenworth, Kansas City, and Lawrence were obviously in the midst of their battle to gain advantage on the transportation front, and the decisions being made in Washington at that time with respect to land grants were vital to their future interests.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Indian treaties; Jayhawkers; Johnnycake, Charles; Kansas City, Missouri; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 29, 1858
In this letter from Lawrence, December 29, 1858, Smith mentions a few business matters (e.g., the railroad convention) but concentrates on the border conflict, with specific criticism leveled at John Brown and James Montgomery. "Captains Brown & Montgomery continue their 'reign of terror' in Linn and Bourbon counties. . . ."

Keywords: African Americans; Bleeding Kansas; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Jayhawking; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Newspapers; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves; Smith, Samuel C.


Letter, [Governor] S. [Samuel] Medary to My Dear Sir [former governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Medary, S. (Samuel) , 1801-1864
Date: January 13, 1859
Governor Samuel Medary, writing from Lecompton, Kansas Territory to former governor James W. Denver, reported on his successful effort to convince the Territorial House of Representatives to pass a bill establishing a special court to try James Montgomery and other free state supporters allegedly engaged in violence in southeast Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Jayhawkers; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Violence


Photograph, James W. Denver
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
James W. Denver was the seventh Territorial Governor, serving from May 12 to July 3 and July 30 through October, 1858. He also served as acting Governor from December 21, 1857 through May 12, 1858. This photograph was taken some time after his service as Territorial Governor.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Photographs and Illustrations


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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