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53 results for Crops:
Circular, Plan of Operations of the Emigrant Aid Company
Authors: Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company
Date: 1854
This circular, written "for the purpose of answering numerous inquiries, concerning the plan of operation of the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company, and the resources of the Kansas Territory", contains two sections. The first outlines the objectives and plans of the Aid Company; the second, longer portion, serves as a type of almanac about journeying to and settling in Kansas Territory. The Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company was the predecessor of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, which was formed in 1855.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Circulars; Crops; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Landscape; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company; Native Americans; Park, George S.; Smoky Hill Valley, Kansas Territory; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Transportation; Wakarusa River; Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


Letter, Wm [Goodnow] to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: June 17, 1855
William Goodnow wrote from Shannon, Wild Cat Creek, Kansas Territory, to his wife in New England. Goodnow commented on the weather and crops of the Territory, contrasting them with his experiences back East. Recovering from an illness, he had observed that there had been much traffic of soldiers, teams, and equipment passing by on their way to Fort Riley, "12 miles above here." Goodnow also mentioned that the Territorial Legislature was slated to convene at Pawnee, only 2 miles from his settlement, during the next week, though he supposed that "its doings will be illegal & void."

Keywords: Crops; Daily life; Denison, Joseph; Diseases; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Goodnow, William E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory; Weather


Letter, [John Brown, Jr.] to Dear Father [John Brown]
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: June 22, 1855
This rather lengthy letter from John Brown, Jr., at Brownsville, K.T., to his father, John Brown, regarding the Kansas family's current situation, physically and economically. John, Jr., provides a hand-drawn map of the family's settlement in Franklin County (he calls it "Brown Co.") just west of Osawatomie.

Keywords: Agriculture; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Crops; Farmers; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Free state settlers; Land claims; Missourians; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Ottawa Indians; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory


Letter, Salmon Brown to Dear Father [John Brown]
Authors: Brown, Salmon
Date: June 22, 1855
From Osawatomie, son Salmon Brown wrote his to John Brown who had stopped in Rockford, Illinois, on his journey to Kansas Territory, where he was expected "before fall." Along with references to the provisions and clothing that might be needed, and the crops of corn, beans, turnips, and squash they expected to harvest, Salmon wrote "There are slaves owned within three miles of us."

Keywords: African Americans; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Salmon; Crops; Free state settlers; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Rockford, Illinois; Slaves; Slaves in Kansas Territory


Letter, Wm [Goodnow] to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: July 1, 1855
William Goodnow, brother of Isaac Goodnow, wrote from Shannon, Wild Cat Creek, Kansas Territory, to his wife Harriet in New England. Goodnow described his current activities, among them serving on the Manhattan city council along with his brother. He related his experience of seeing Governor Reeder pass by on his way to Pawnee, and judged him "fully able. . .to meet any Missouri renegade." Goodnow also anticipated that the free soil members of the Territorial Legislature would resign "not acknowledging this Legislature as a constitutional one."

Keywords: Crops; Diseases; Free Soil Party; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Harriet; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Town development; Travel; Women


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: July 29, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote letters from several cities to his wife, Mary Holliday, after leaving their home at Meadville, Pennsylvania to return to business at Topeka, Kansas Territory. Once in Lawrence, K. T., he reported the political situation to his wife. Governor Andrew H. Reeder, who expected violence, and the fraudulently elected Territorial Legislature were at loggerheads. (Holliday had been elected to the Legislature in a reelection called by Governor Reeder during Holliday's absence, but the reelection results were rejected by the Legislature.) Holliday also mentioned the good corn crop and warm weather and expressed his love for his wife and daughter, Lillie, born March 18.

Keywords: Agriculture; Crops; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lum, S. Y; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shawnee Indian Reserve; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Violence; Weather


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: August 29, 1855
Josiah Miller, making arrangements for his parents' journey from South Carolina to Kansas Territory, wrote to his father and mother from his office at the Kansas Free State newspaper. He told them of his need to purchase personal arms for his own protection and described to them a recent situation of election fraud. Miller also wrote that his goal, as a newspaper editor, was to "move men to support the Free State ticket." He added that he was having a falling out with Robert Elliott, his business partner.

Keywords: Crops; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election fraud; Elliott, Robert G.; Free state activities; Kansas Free State (newspaper); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Newspapers; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: November 2, 1855
In this letter from "Brownsville, Kansas Territory," John Brown made some observations about the harshness of the weather, the health of his Kansas children, their general lack of preparedness for the winter, and the farm work that needed to be accomplished. His only comment about the political situation in the territory came in closing: "I feel more, & more confident that Slavery will soon die out here; & to God be the praise."

Keywords: Agriculture; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Crops; Farmers; Free state cause; Free state settlers; Houses; Slavery; Weather


Circular, Information for Kanzas Immigrants, 1855
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: 1855
Thomas Webb compiled the information in this circular not to "entice people to go to the Kanzas", but rather to "collect the best and most reliable information relative to the Territory, and furnish the same to those desiring it." The circular provides details about the logistics of the trip to Kansas: when and how it should be done, and what provisions to take, for example. It also includes information about subjects such as weather, farming, Indians, and employment, to name a few.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Circulars; Crops; Farmers; Freight and freightage; Land acquisition; Merchandise; Merchants; Native Americans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Settlement; Timber; Transportation; Travel literature; Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Tenant agreement, Thomas N. Stinson and Edward Hoogland
Authors: Hoogland, Edward ; Stinson, Thomas N.
Date: March 17, 1856
Agreement in which Thomas N. Stinson agreed to rent twenty acres of land to Edward Hoogland in exchange for one-third of the crops produced on the land.

Keywords: Agriculture; Crops; Farm tenancy; Hoogland, Edward; Land tenure; Legal documents; Rent; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Stinson, Thomas N.; Tenant farming (see Farm tenancy)


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: June 16, 1856
Cyrus K. Holliday of Topeka, Kansas Territory advised his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, to read northern papers for new of Kansas. He repeated that she wait to come. Troops from Fort Riley and Fort Leavenworth led by Colonel Edwin V. Sumner gathered to battle proslavery forces led by General John W. Whitfield. Cyrus also mentioned a house and crops, receiving Mary's money and, despite difficulties, he praised Kansas as a home for settlers.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Crops; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Newspapers; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Whitfield, John W. (John Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879


Letter, E. D. G. [Ellen Goodnow] to My Dear Sister Harriet [Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Ellen
Date: May 18, 1856
Ellen Goodnow, wife of Isaac Goodnow, wrote to her sister-in-law, Harriet, in New England. In this mostly personal letter, Goodnow reports on the joys and limitations of life in Kansas Territory, stating "I can say truly that I enjoy life as well here as I ever did anywhere." She did not anticipate trouble from border ruffians in their area, as her family's settlement was "too far from Missouri, too near Fort Riley", telling Harriet she would be "enraptured. . .in this country"; Ellen looked forward to a visit from her.

Keywords: Crops; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Harriet; Military roads; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Doctor [Franklin Crane]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: November 24, 1856
Cyrus Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to Doctor Franklin Crane, an influential citizen in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Holliday gave his opinions about the prospects for Kansas entering the union as a free state and the stand of the Democratic party. He also discussed the sale of part of his corn crop in Kansas.

Keywords: Crane, Franklin Loomis; Crops; Democratic Party (U.S.); Emigration and immigration; Free state prospects; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Meadville, Pennsylvania


Testimony of S. H. Moore
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: November 28, 1856
This testimony made up a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal reminiscences that was apparently recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular account relates the experience of S. H. Moore, a resident of Ottawa, Kansas Territory. Mr. Moore describes the land, vegetation, etc. around Ottawa and mentions various settlers from the area.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Crops; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Moore, S. H.; National Kansas Committee; Ottawa, Kansas Territory; Postal service


Testimony of Capt. S. T. Shore
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 2, 1856
This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856. Yet, while he was active in the free state cause, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the territory. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

Keywords: Agriculture; Crops; Grain; Livestock; Ottawa Creek, Kansas Territory; Shore, Samuel T.; Sickness (see Illness)


Kansas Experiences of A.R. Scolen, William Reap, Ephraim Coy, and Capt. Samuel Anderson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 21, 1856 - December 23, 1856
These testimonies were collected from a number of free state settlers along Pottawatomie Creek, presumably by an associate of the National Kansas Committee. Each account includes personal information about the settler (their origins, family, crops, etc.) and also testimonies of their involvement in the free state militia.

Keywords: Agriculture; Anderson, Samuel; Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, Jr.; Casualties; Cline, Captain; Clothing and dress; Coy, Ephraim; Crops; Food; Free state activities; Free state cause; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Illness; Livestock; Militia; Missourians; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Reap, William; Scolen, A.R.; Shore, Samuel T.; Sickness (see Illness); Skirmishing; Travel; Wounds and injuries


Kansas Experience of Charles E. Dewey
Authors: Dewey, Charles E.
Date: December 24, 1856
In this testimony, Charles E. Dewey described how his family and others in their party traveled to Kansas from Ohio. The group sought advice from S. C. Pomeroy about where to settle, and at his urging, they located on South Pottawatomie Creek, possibly in Anderson County. He included in this testimony the names and stories of people that he encountered on his journey and during his early years in the territory. One particularly interesting account was the conflict between a group of Germans and Dewey's party over possession of land claims. Dewey also included details of the difficulties for settlers in Kansas Territory during the years 1855 and 1856. Furthermore, within this testimony he states the experiences of the Winkly brothers who were boarding with him.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Claims (see Damage claims or Land claims); Crops; Dewey, Charles E.; Emigration and immigration; Germans; Health; Illness; Land claim disputes; Land claims; Livestock; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness); Transportation; Weather


Circular, Information for Kanzas Immigrants, 1856
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: 1856
Thomas Webb expanded the information in his previous version of this circular to produce a more current edition. Topics such as travel routes, preparation, and provisions are still discussed, while more information regarding town settlements, accommodations, and family life are new additions.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Brown, John Carter; Cities and towns; Crops; Farmers; Freight and freightage; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Merchandise; Merchants; Native Americans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Settlement; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Timber; Town development; Transportation; Travel literature; Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Expense Sheet, E. B. Whitman to National Kansas Committee
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: February 28, 1857 - August 14, 1857
This expense sheet, which was in account with E. B. Whitman, an agent of the committee, lists expenses and supplies sent to aid the free state inhabitants of Kansas. The items sent include (among others) wheat, oats, corn, beans, potatoes, garden seeds, bedding, and clothing.

Keywords: Agriculture; Clothing and dress; Crops; Finance; Financial statements; Food; Grain; House furnishings; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Seeds; Vegetables; Wagons


Speech, John Brown
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: ca. March 1857
During the spring of 1857, John Brown traveled to several Northeastern cities (specifically, in Brown's home state of Connecticut) to solicit financial support for the Kansas crusade. In the speech delivered from these handwritten notes, Brown outlined some of the many sacrifices he and others had made to give his audience a sense of what was needed and discussed the unfolding situation in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Buford expedition; Cato, Sterling G.; Crops; Finance; Free state cause; Hartford, Connecticut; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Osawatomie, Battle of; Proslavery activities; Speeches, addresses, etc.


Letter, John W. Robinson to Hiram Hill
Authors: Robinson, John W.
Date: August 17, 1857
John Robinson, President and Agent of the Manhattan Town Association, wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Robinson responded to Hill's interest in investing in the town, describing the town's current situation, climate, and development rate. He provided specific and dramatic examples of increasing property values, and assured Hill that there would be no land speculation; he would only sell lots to those investors who were willing to build.

Keywords: Big Blue River; Churches; Crops; Droughts; Goodnow, William E.; Hill, Hiram; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Robinson, John W.; Smythe, Edward B.; Stonemasons; Timber; Town associations; Town development


Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear Brother"
Authors: Anderson, J. G.
Date: August 23, 1857
Writing to his brother from Barnesville (Bourbon County) on August 28, 1857, Jeremiah Goldsmith Anderson, a native of Indiana and follower of James Montgomery in southeast Kansas, described a variety of mundane matters regarding conditions in Kansas, including land claims and the construction of a steam sawmill on the river.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; County seats; Crops; Farmers; Free state settlers; Missouri; Proslavery settlers; Sawmills; Sickness (see Illness); Timber claim


Letter, Owen Brown to Dear Mother [Mary Brown]
Authors: Brown, Owen
Date: August 27, [1856]
On August 27, 1856, from Tabor, Iowa, Owen Brown wrote to tell his mother that according to all accounts "Father is the most daring courageous man in Kansas" and to relate other happenings in K.T. involving Jim Lane and Governor Shannon. Another invasion from Missouri was rumored, but free state recruits were assembling and "the Missourians are trembling in their Boots."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Owen; Crops; Free state militia; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Weapons (see also Guns); Woodson, Daniel


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar E. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: September 22, 1857
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. Learnard told Oscar of his desire to move the rest of the family to Kansas Territory, if only at least to see his "much praised and extolled land." He also commented on the recent slowing of the economy, and gave Oscar business advice. Throughout S.T. Learnard's letter, his strong opposition to slavery in Kansas is made clear.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Crops; Economic conditions; Herald of Freedom; Kansas Territory; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; National politics; Vermont


Circular, Information for Kanzas Immigrants, 1857
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: 1857
Thomas Webb compiled this more comprehensive version of his earlier circulars by the same name. Containing much of the same information as the previous versions, such as details about the logistics of the trip to Kansas and subjects such as weather, farming, Indians, and employment, it features a large section that describes individual town settlements. This circular also addresses the proslavery and free state conflict, though in a nonpartisan manner, considering the interests of both groups.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Books; Brown, John Carter; Circulars; Crops; Diseases; Education; Food; Guns; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Libraries; Merchandise; Merchants; Native Americans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Newspapers; Religion; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Town settlement; Transportation; Travel literature; Weapons (see also Guns); Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Vansickle, John H.
Date: July 11, 1858
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County to his Father and Mother outside Kansas Territory. Vansickle spoke of a recent trip to Iowa, though it was short because he was anxious to return home. He added that grain crops in the area were doing the best he had ever seen. Vansickle also told his parents of his marriage three days earlier to Martha Stevenson, and invited them both for a visit, as the current climate of "perfect peas" [sic, peace] made the journey a safer one.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Crops; Daily life; Farmers; Marriage; Vansickle, John H.


Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
Authors: Vansickle, John H.
Date: July 18, 1858
John Vansickle, recently married, wrote from Kansas City, Missouri, where he was purchasing goods and provisions with his wife for their new home. Vansickle communicated the prospect of a good crop this season, along with details referring to the upcoming Lecompton Constitution ratification election and the Marais des Cygnes Massacre, which occurred the past May. He also encouraged the recipient of this letter to come to Kansas Territory for a visit and gave news of his encounter with various friends when in St. Louis.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Crops; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; Farmers; Gold mines and mining; Kansas City, Missouri; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Merchandise; Montgomery County, Kansas Territory; Vansickle, John H.


Letter, John McCannon to Col. Jas. B. Abbott
Authors: McCannon, John
Date: July 24, 1858
John McCannon, who had once served as Quartermaster for the Kansas free state militia, wrote from Little Osage, Kansas Territory, to James Abbott in Lawrence. McCannon reported that peace reigned in the area in the wake of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre of the past May. Referring to the current Constitutional controversy, he proclaimed, "Lecompton can not live on the Osage", as there were not enough proslavery supporters in the area to approve it were it put to a popular vote. McCannon did not seem to be concerned that U.S. Troops had recently arrived at Fort Scott, for reasons unknown to him, as local towns thrived and crops flourished.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Coal; Crops; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Gristmills; Lebanon, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; McCannon, John; Military; Sawmills; Timber; Town development


Letter, Ellen D. Goodnow to My Dear Husband [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Ellen
Date: July 25, 1858
Ellen Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to her husband, Isaac, while he was traveling. She included news of recent heavy rains, which had washed out bridges and roads, slowing travel and mail delivery. However, the crops were prospering as a result. Goodnow also described much illness and fever in the area, herself included. She closed the letter with a recipe for shaving soap.

Keywords: Crops; Daily life; Domestics; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Illness; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Recipes; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Weather


Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
Authors: Vansickle, John H.
Date: September 1, 1858
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County to the recipient (most likely a family member) regarding his business selling goods. Money was scarce for him, though the crops were faring well. Vansickle included the current prices for various commodities and told of his plans to travel East the following spring. He expressed concern that he had not heard from many of his friends since moving to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Business enterprises; Crops; Daily life; Economic conditions; Merchants; Prices; Vansickle, John H.; Xenia, Kansas Territory


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Friend [Franklin B.] Sanborn
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: December 14, 1858
After returning to Lawrence from a trip east, Whitman wrote Franklin B. Sanborn a mostly personal letter regarding the preparations for the winter and need to extend the loan owed to Sanborn--he had crops enough for subsistence but little cash. Near the end, Whitman commented briefly on the political situation, which was "quiet" at present, but "the difficulties in Linn & Bourbon Counties are renewed" and "J. B. is on the ground and engaged in 'Regulating.'"

Keywords: Agriculture; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Crops; Farmers; Free state legislature; Insurance; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lawrence; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, E. C. Andreas to Friend [William] Goodnow
Authors: Andreas, E.C.
Date: January 25, 1859
E. C. Andreas wrote from New England to his friend William Goodnow in Kansas Territory. Andreas reacted to news he had heard regarding "commotion" in the Territory caused by "modern Democrats" and border ruffians, calling them "far worse than fever & ague." He communicated the opinion that there was little hope for Kansas to be admitted to the Union under the current Congress and Administration. Andreas also mentioned Goodnow's management of his land titles.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Buchanan administration; Crops; Democratic Party (U.S.); Goodnow, William E.; National politics; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas)


Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
Authors: Vansickle, John H.
Date: February 4, 1859
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County responding to his recipient's previous letter. Vansickle seemed hopeful, as he saw there was a "prospect of peace" in his part of the country, and his business and crops were successful. He also commented on James Montgomery and John Brown, criticizing that they "free more horses than negros," calling them scoundrels and warning his recipient to "never vindicate thare [their] cause." Vansickle added that he would assist the recipient in coming to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Crops; Land claims; Merchants; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Vansickle, John H.; Xenia, Kansas Territory


Letter, Henry L. Denison to My Dear Uncle [Joseph Denison]
Authors: Denison, Henry
Date: May 11, 1859
Henry Denison wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle, Joseph Denison, who was traveling away from home. Henry reported that the cornerstone of Bluemont College had been laid the day before, and described the festivities, including speeches and the planting of a kind of time capsule behind the cornerstone. He added that crops had sprouted and were growing beautifully; emigrants continued to pass through on their way to Pikes Peak.

Keywords: Blood, C.E.; Bluemont Central College; Celebrations; Crops; Denison, Henry; Denison, Joseph; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Pikes Peak gold rush; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Riley County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: June 8, 1859
From Cleveland, Ohio, Kagi jokingly wrote his sister that in the absence of any letters from the family, he had feared they had set off for "Pikes Peak, and had died of suffering on the route, as others have." Kagi expected to leave in order to take up his "business in earnest" shortly--that is, to implement Brown's plan and move on Harpers Ferry.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Crops; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Kagi, John Henry; Pikes Peak gold rush; Weather


Book, Gunn's Map and Handbook of Kansas and the Gold Mines
Authors: Gunn, O.B. (Otis Berthoude, 1828-1901)
Date: 1859
This book by O.B. Gunn, a civil engineer in Wyandotte, provides basic information about Kansas Territory and the living conditions there. The first half outlines statistics about the population, climate, crops, telegraph access, etc. for the use of potential settlers. The second half describes routes to gold mines in Western Kansas Territory and advises the best travel seasons and provisions necessary to make the journey. Includes more than 20 pages of business and trade advertisements, including Gunn's own advertisement on p. 57.

Keywords: Crops; Daily life; Gold mines and mining; Gunn, O.B. (Otis Berthoude, 1828-1901); Kansas Territory; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Land claims; Mining; Native Americans; Pikes Peak gold rush; Railroads; Settlement; Telegraph; Weather; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
John Wakefield, Douglas County, Kansas Territory, filed claim # 96 for damages caused by the territorial militia on September 1, 1856. He was a farmer and his loses included crops of potatoes, corn, and a garden as well as a house and its furnishings. He also claimed damage to his well. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Crops; Damage claims; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; House furnishings; Militia; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Wakefield, John A.


Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Benjamin S. Hancock submitted claim # 163 for agricultural equipment, livestock, and crops that were destroyed at various times in 1855 and 1856. His list of livestock and other items claim is very detailed. He lived near Lecompton in Douglas County. His losses were caused by the territorial militia under the command of several including William Martin, John Randolph, Colonel Titus, General Richardson, and General Stringfellow. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Crops; Damage claims; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Hancock, Benjamin S.; Livestock; Martin, William; Militia; Randolph, John; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Stringfellow, John H.; Titus, Henry Theodore


Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Claim #240 was filed on behalf of Ann Hooper, who lived with her son John L. Hooper, near Lawrence. The items listed were destroyed or stolen in August and September, 1856, and included animals, crops and household items. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Crops; Damage claims; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Hooper, Ann; Hooper, John L.; Horses; House furnishings; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Livestock; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Women


Reports from Eureka Township, Greenwood County, etc.
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1860
This document contained additional reports of conditions in various counties during the drought of 1860. It consisted of letters that W. F. M. Arny copied and sent to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The reports were submitted by Josiah G. Fuller, James Whary, and Henry Brock, Eureka, Greenwood County; W. A. Harris and A. L Williams, Cottonwood Falls, Chase County; H. H. George, W. Wendell, and R. W. Cloud, Waterloo, Breckenridge County; I. P. Herrick, Iowa Township, Doniphan County; G. S. Northrup, J. H. Spicey, and A. G. Carpenter, Geneva Township, Allen County; and Charles P. Twiss, Cofachique Township, Allen County. The reports described prospects for crops and other conditions resulting from the prolonged drought.

Keywords: Agriculture; Allen County, Kansas Territory; Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Brock, Henry; Carpenter, A. G.; Chase County, Kansas Territory; Cloud, R. W.; Cofachique Township, Allen County, Kansas Territory; Cottonwood Falls, Kansas Territory; Crops; Droughts; Eureka, Kansas Territory; Famines; Fuller, Josiah G.; Geneva Township, Allen County, Kansas Territory; George, H. H.; Grain; Greenwood County, Kansas Territory; Harris, W. A.; Herrick, I. P.; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Livestock; Northrup, G. S.; Relief; Spicey, J. H.; Twiss, Charles P.; Wendell, W.; Whary, James; Williams, A. L.


Miscellaneous accounts of conditions resulting from drought
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1860
These accounts discussed the price of land (both in the past and currently), the number of settlers (often diminished from past numbers), and the nature of crops and available produce. This report included accounts from Mosley (a buffalo hunter) from Greenwood County; an African-American named Buckner from Otoe County; Thomas A. Hill, Greenwood County; Rev. Henry Moys, Madison County; John L. Pratt, Butler County; H. I. Hunter, B. F. Vanhorn, Judge Graham, and Myrock Huntley, Madison County; Peter Welsh, Osage County; William Thurman; Osage Indians; John Jones, Ottawa Creek; S. N. Howe, Coffey County; E. Condit, Woodson County; and J. C. Lambdin, Butler County. One of the letters copied in this report was addressed to W. F. M. Arny, and was written by J.C. Lambdin.

Keywords: African Americans; Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Buckner; Butler County, Kansas Territory; Coffey County, Kansas Territory; Condit, E.; Crops; Droughts; Famines; Graham, Judge; Grain; Greenwood County, Kansas Territory; Hill, Thomas A.; Howe, S. N.; Hunter, H. I.; Huntley, Myrock; Jones, John; Lambdin, J. C.; Madison County, Kansas Territory; Mosley; Moys, Rev. Henry; Osage County, Kansas Territory; Otoe County, Kansas Territory; Pratt, John L.; Thurman, William; Vanhorn, B. F.; Welsh, Peter


Letter, John James Ingalls to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: April 3, 1860
Ingalls devoted much of his April 3, 1860, letter from Sumner to the territory's agricultural prospects, which were still not particularly good: "Corn, pork, and hides" were Kansas's only exports, and they were not very profitable as prices were low. "Considerable attention," wrote Ingalls, "is being paid to the hemp crop" and the wheat seemed to be doing pretty well; various kinds of fruit also "flourishes. . . . I have never seen finer apples than the farmers across the river bring to market. . . . But little is raised in Kansas yet, though much attention is being given to 'orchardizing' this spring." Ingalls was actually considering a move to the Gold County (Colorado) for better business prospects.

Keywords: Agriculture; Business; Colorado gold fields; Crops; Economic conditions; Economic development; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Land speculation; Pikes Peak gold rush; Speculation; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Telegraph


Letter, H. [Henry] L. Denison to My Dear Uncle [Joseph Denison]
Authors: Denison, Henry
Date: August 2, 1860
Henry Denison wrote from Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle Joseph Denison, a Trustee of the College. Henry informed him that dry summer conditions had significantly impeded crop growth. The drought also affected the construction of the College, as the plasterers depended on the water supply of a nearby creek to mix their plaster; carpenters, however, moved forward with their work. Henry closed with a mention of a recent eclipse.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Construction; Crops; Denison, Henry; Denison, Joseph; Droughts; School buildings


Letter, W. H. Powell to "Dear Sir" [James Blood]
Authors: Powell, W. H.
Date: August 26, 1860
From Bloomington, Illinois, W. H. Powell, the Illinois State Superintendent of Public Instruction, wrote that he had noticed Blood's call for seed wheat for the "unfortunate settlers of Kansas," and he wondered if they would be interested in trading "for Stock--either Cattle or Stock Hogs." Powell offered to arrange shipment of 2000 bushels of "good seed wheat" immediately if a deal were struck. He wrote that farmers in his area were growing "Red Amber wheat, and that if Blood needed a character reference, he could contact "Mr. Lincoln at Springfield, where I reside, & who can vouch for my good faith &C."

Keywords: Blood, James; Crops; Droughts; Farmers; Free state settlers; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Springfield, Illinois


Letter, James W. Randall to Mr. Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Randall, James W.
Date: September 12, 1860
In this letter, James Randall of Emporia, Kansas informed Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, of the drought's effect on the neighboring population. Many families were destitute after the failure of the corn crop and were considering leaving their homes altogether. Mr. Randall hoped that Mr. Hyatt could send aid for the starving settlers.

Keywords: Americus Township, Breckinridge County, Kansas Territory; Breckinridge County, Kansas Territory (see also Lyon County, Kansas); Business; Chase County, Kansas Territory; Clothing and dress; Crops; Droughts; Emporia, Kansas Territory; Famines; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Land claims; Lyon County, Kansas (see also Breckinridge County, Kansas Territory); Randall, James W.; Relief


Letter, W. H. Powell to "Dear Sir" [James Blood]
Authors: Powell, W. H.
Date: September 12, 1860
A Rev. Charles Reynolds, who wrote to Blood on the 7th and the 10th of September, had raised some $600-$700 in relief money and contacted Powell to ask him to purchase and ship some "winter wheat" to Kansas Territory. Writing from his home in Springfield, Powell indicated that he would do so "with pleasure" but the "best winter wheat" had just been sold. He intended to locate a good supply and ship it by railroad as soon as possible.

Keywords: Agriculture; Blood, James; Chicago, Illinois; Crops; National Kansas Committee; Railroads; Relief; Reynolds, Charles; Springfield, Illinois; Transportation


Letter, Thaddeus Hyatt to the New York Tribune (Draft No. 3)
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: September 14, 1860
Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to the New York Tribune in order to make New Englanders aware of the destitution and suffering of settlers in Kansas Territory. Hyatt gave accounts of conditions in Americus and Emporia townships in Breckenridge County, and also in Jackson and Lawrence. The letter reported the condition of crops, cattle disease, etc. It contained similar information to other statements from Kansas settlers during the drought of 1860.

Keywords: Agriculture; Americus Township, Breckinridge County, Kansas Territory; Breckinridge County, Kansas Territory (see also Lyon County, Kansas); Crops; Droughts; Economic conditions; Emporia Township, Breckinridge County, Kansas Territory; Famines; Grain; Livestock; Lyon County, Kansas (see also Breckinridge County, Kansas Territory); Poverty; Relief


Letter, John Kimball to Br. [Isaac] Goodnow
Authors: Kimball, John
Date: September 22, 1860
John Kimball wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Isaac Goodnow, who was traveling away from his home in K.T. Kimball reported on the occupations of a religious camp in the town, within which "the Good Lord is converting sinners." Kimball also discussed the severe drought they were experiencing, and reported great damage to crops in the area. He added news of the Manhattan Express newspaper's expansion to Junction City and an acquaintance's journey to Pikes Peak.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Crops; Droughts; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Kimball, John; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Religious communities; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Travel; de Vivaldi, Charles F.


Article, "The Drouth and Famine in Kansas"
Authors: New York Daily Tribune
Date: October 10, 1860
This newspaper article, published in the New York Daily Tribune from October 10, 1860, outlined the basic details of the suffering and destitution of settlers in Kansas. It also included reprints of two circulars originating from Kansas Territory. One was from the Presbytery of Highland, and the other was from the Central Relief Committee based in Leavenworth. The first reprinted circular provided information about the dire situation and gave the names of the members of this committee. The second circular requested that the elders and deacons of each church in Kansas ascertain how many families needed immediate assistance in order to present a full report to the Central Relief Committee.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Central Relief Committee; Churches; Clothing and dress; Crops; Doniphan County, Kansas Territory; Droughts; Economic conditions; Famines; Food; Grain; Highland, Kansas Territory; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Presbyterian Church; Reaser, Rev. J. G.; Relief; Relief funds; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Dear [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: October 10, 1860
In this letter, S. C. Pomeroy wrote from Atchison, Kansas to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter revolved around the suffering of the settlers and their desperate search for provisions and employment. Pomeroy also mentioned the prospect of obtaining a large amount of buffalo meat, as well as the failed corn crop and the generally destitute condition of the settlers. He truly feared for the lives of the settlers during the upcoming winter.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Bison; Crops; Economic conditions; Elmore, Rush; Famines; Food; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Grain; Grasshopper Falls, Kansas Territory; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Relief; Topeka, Kansas; Vegetables


Letter, [W. F. M.] Arny to Brother [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Arny, W F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881
Date: October 15, 1860
W.F.M. Arny, agent of the National Kansas Committee, continued to send Thaddeus Hyatt, president of this committee, copies of letters he had received from Kansas settlers. These letters described the economic conditions resulting from the continued drought during 1860. The reports were submitted by Rev. J. W. Fox, Ridgeway, Kansas Territory; the "Committee on the Little Osage," Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Dr. I. W. Robinson, Manhattan, Kansas Territory; and Joseph M. Todd and others, Greenwood Township, Greenwood County, Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Agriculture; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Crops; Droughts; Economic conditions; Famines; Fox, J. W.; Greenwood County, Kansas Territory; Greenwood Township, Greenwood County, Kansas Territory; Livestock; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Medicine; Relief; Ridgeway, Kansas Territory; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Robinson, I.; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Todd, Joseph M.


Letter, C. W. Holder to J. Blood Esq.
Authors: Holder, C. W.
Date: October 27, 1860
As were several other individuals from Illinois, Holder wrote to notify Blood that the people in his community (around Bloomington, Illinois) were eager to share their "abundance" with "their brethren in Kansas." They were preparing to send potatoes, as well as wheat and oats, but needed help purchasing sacks and paying freight; "our people as you are probably aware are just recovering from the financial pressure of the past 3 years" and thus had "little money."

Keywords: Agriculture; Blood, James; Crops; Droughts; Illinois; Panic of 1857; Relief; Transportation


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Friend [Franklin B.] Sanborn
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: November 15, 1860
In this typically long letter/report to Franklin Sanborn in Boston, Whitman wrote from Lawrence on November 15, 1860, regarding the difficult situation facing Kansas settlers/farmers as another winter approached--as "the stock of old corn is exhausted and the grass fails, the prospect is dreary enough and without aid from abroad in some form to supply bread stuffs many of our people must suffer severely for want of food."

Keywords: Agriculture; Crops; Droughts; Free state settlers; Free state supporters; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Relief; Relief funds; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Whitman, E. B.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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