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18 results for Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884:
Letter, Ruth [Brown Thompson] to Dear Mother [Mary Brown]
Authors: Brown Thompson, Ruth
Date: November 15, 1854
From the family's place in North Elba, New York, daughter Ruth wrote to say that "Father arrived here last night and is well with the exception of a cold." To quickly, she "rejoiced to hear that he has given up the idea of going to Kansas," and instead, Ruth now believed, would be moving to North Elba. Ruth wrote of the preparations she and husband Henry Thompson would make for Mary Brown's move and of other members of the family.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Kansas Territory; North Elba, New York; Thompson, Ruth (Brown)


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: September 4, 1855
In Scott Co., Iowa ("about 4 miles West of the Mississippi"), on his way to Kansas Territory, John Brown wrote the family to say all was well despite some delays caused by their freight in Chicago and a sick horse. Brown commented mostly on the nature of there journey to date and some miscellaneous business matters.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Oliver; Brown, Watson, 1835-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Iowa; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Travel


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: October 13, 1855
One week after arriving at his sons' settlement ("Brownville") near Osawatomie, Brown wrote the family back east that although most were sick when he first arrived, they "appear now to be mending." The trip across Missouri was without incident, except for problems with a sick horse and their "heavy load." Brown then wrote briefly of the Adairs, the "most uncomfortable situation" in which he found his children upon his arrival, and other things including prairie fires and finally the political situation in the territory. In fact, at this early date, John Brown "believe[d] Missouri is fast becoming discouraged about making Kansas a Slave State & think the prospect of its becoming Free is brightening every day."

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Agriculture; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Election, Topeka Constitution delegates to convention, October 1855; Free state; Free state settlers; Missouri; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Settlement; Weather


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: November 2, 1855
In this letter from "Brownsville, Kansas Territory," John Brown made some observations about the harshness of the weather, the health of his Kansas children, their general lack of preparedness for the winter, and the farm work that needed to be accomplished. His only comment about the political situation in the territory came in closing: "I feel more, & more confident that Slavery will soon die out here; & to God be the praise."

Keywords: Agriculture; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Crops; Farmers; Free state cause; Free state settlers; Houses; Slavery; Weather


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: December 16, 1855
Soon after his return from Lawrence, where he and other volunteers had successfully defended that place, John Brown wrote from Osawatomie to give his family "a brief account of the invasion," the so-called Wakarusa War. As it turned out, Brown provided some interesting details about their preparations and arrival in the besieged city and the negotiations that were ongoing when the Browns came on the scene. The Free State leaders, according to Brown, skillfully accomplished and signed an agreement with Governor Shannon that was "much to their own liking."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Barber, Thomas W.; Bogus legislature; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Coleman, Franklin M.; Dow, Charles W.; Free state cause; Free state militia; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery supporters; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sharps rifles; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown]
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: March 6, 1857
During his funding raising tour, Brown wrote his wife from Hartford, Connecticut, regarding family matters and finances, and about the press coverage he was getting: "I shall send you some Newspapers soon to let you see what different stories are told of me. None of them tell things as I tell them."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Owen; Hartford, Connecticut; Newspapers


Letter, Your Affectionate Husband & Father [John Brown] to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: March 12, 1857
In this brief letter to his family from Springfield, Mass., John Brown mentioned letters from some of the children and his speaking engagements in Connecticut, specifically at Canton "where both Father & Mother were raised." People there had given him $80 and a monument inscribed to honor Frederick.

Keywords: Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Canton, Ohio; Finance; Free state support


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [John Brown]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 20, 1857
While John Brown was touring the East in March of 1857 he received this letter from Amos Lawrence, Boston, who informed Brown that he (Lawrence) had recently "sent to Kansas near $14,000 to establish a fund" for the support of common and secondary schools. As a result, Lawrence wrote he was short of cash and could not give Brown what he had requested. Nevertheless, "in case anything shd occur while you are engaged in a great & good to shorten yr life, you may be assured that yr wife and children shall be cared for more liberally than you now propose."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Education; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: July 17, 1857
In a very brief letter to his "wife & children," John Brown wrote from Iowa, en route to Kansas, that travel was slow because of the freight they were hauling and that little news of interest was coming from Kansas." He closed: "I would give anything to know that I should be permitted to see you all again in this life. But Gods will be done. To his infinite grace I commend you all."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Iowa; Kansas Territory; Religion; Transportation; Travel


Letter, N. Hawkins [John Brown] to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859; Hawkins, N.
Date: August 17, 1857
Using the alias Nelson Hawkins, John Brown wrote his family from Tabor, Iowa, on August 17, 1857, regarding some family matters and their slow trip to Kansas. He seems to suggest that if things continue quiet in K.T. he might soon direct his attention to the East.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Free state cause; Hawkins, N.; Iowa; Tabor, Iowa


Letter, Owen Brown to Dear Mother [Mary Brown]
Authors: Brown, Owen
Date: August 27, [1856]
On August 27, 1856, from Tabor, Iowa, Owen Brown wrote to tell his mother that according to all accounts "Father is the most daring courageous man in Kansas" and to relate other happenings in K.T. involving Jim Lane and Governor Shannon. Another invasion from Missouri was rumored, but free state recruits were assembling and "the Missourians are trembling in their Boots."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Owen; Crops; Free state militia; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Weapons (see also Guns); Woodson, Daniel


Letter, John Brown to My Dear Wife [Mary Brown]
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: March 3, 1858
In this short, mostly personal letter from New York, John Brown wrote his wife that he was "having a constant series of both great encouragements & discouragements," even though he had found "a much more earnest feeling among the colored people than ever before; but that is by no means universal."

Keywords: African Americans; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; New York; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Smith, Gerritt


Letter, Your Affectionate Husband & Father [John Brown] to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: March 2, 1859
From Springdale, Cedar County, Iowa, Brown wrote this short letter to tell his family that all was "well," despite that persistent "ague," and to discuss some family business matters: buying a team, etc.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Health; Horses; Iowa


Letter, John Brown to My Dear Wife [Mary Brown]
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: November 16, 1859
In this letter to his wife, from the Charlestown, Virginia, jail, John Brown wrote mainly of his children--especially the daughters--and his ideas about the proper education for them, in light of the fact that some of his Eastern supporters were offering to provide assistance in this area: "You my wife perfectly well know that I have always expressed a decided preference for a very plain but perfectly practical education for both Sons & Daughters."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Charles Town, Virginia; Charlestown, Virginia; Education; Music; Wattles, Sarah G.


Letter, Mary A. Brown to Dear children one & all
Authors: Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884
Date: November 28, 1859
Writing from somewhere "near" Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she was staying with Lucretia Mott while her husband awaited execution for the Harpers Ferry raid, Mary Brown informed her children that their father wrote "very comforting letters" and of course was secure in his faith. Mrs. Brown wrote of the sympathy that was directed her way and of the belief that their sacrifice would yet do much "for the poor slave." Mrs. Brown expresses her own very articulate anitslavery views (slavery, "the greatest sin that ever rested on our nation") and had been uplifted by the opportunity to hear several "antislavery sermons."

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Mott, Lucretia; Parker, Theodore


Letter, L. Maria Child to Dear Mrs. [Mary] Brown
Authors: Child, Lydia Maria Francis , 1802-1880
Date: December 2, 1860
One year after the execution of John Brown, on December 2, 1860, Mrs. Child wrote the Brown's widow, Mary Brown, regarding the impact her husband's actions and commitment to the cause had had on the country and efforts for "emancipation." She also sent along "a trifle" to help support the Brown family financially.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Child, Lydia Maria Francis, 1802-1880; Slavery


Letter, Wendell Phillips to Dear Friend [Mary Brown]
Authors: Phillips, Wendell
Date: February 25. Year not identified.
It would appear that abolitionist Wendell Phillips wrote this letter to the widow of John Brown shortly after Brown's December 1859 execution to convey to her some financial support--specifically, a $200 bank draft. Phillips mentioned Annie, one of the Brown daughters, and closed with, "What ripe fruit your noble husband's devotion is producing."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884


Letter, Oliver Brown to Dear Folks
Authors: Brown, Oliver
Date: May 16 [1857?]
From Colinsville, Hartford Co., Connecticut (most likely, May 16, 1857), Oliver Brown wrote to his family regarding his current employer, "Mr. [Charles] Blair," who had agreed to pay Oliver $200, plus room and board, for one year. "Mr. Blair is now at work making 1000 Kansas butter knifes for Father," wrote Oliver Brown. He mentioned the presence of Brown relatives in that area and the favorable "reputation of the family [Browns] in Kansas" reflected among the residents there.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Blair, Charles; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Oliver; Collinsville, Connecticut; Hartford, Connecticut; Weapons (see also Guns)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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