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14 results for Antislavery movements:
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Photograph, John Doy rescue party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son Charles left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859. They were then taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After this trial, his son Charles was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail he was freed by friends from Kansas on September 23, 1859. Two different ambrotypes showing the John Doy rescue party were digitized for the project. When you compared the images, you will find the men are standing in different positions.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Abolitionists; Ambrotypes; Antislavery movements; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Firearms; Free state activities; Free state cause; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Hay, George R.; Photographs and Illustrations; Pike, Joshua A.; Senix, Jacob; Simmons, Thomas; Soule, Silas Stillman


Photograph, John Doy rescue party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son Charles left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859. They were then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After this trial Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail he was freed by friends from Kansas on September 23, 1859. Two different ambrotypes showing the John Doy rescue party were digitized for the project. When you compared the images, you will find the men are standing in different positions.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Abolitionists; Ambrotypes; Antislavery movements; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Firearms; Free state activities; Free state cause; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Hay, George R.; Photographs and Illustrations; Pike, Joshua A.; Senix, Jacob; Simmons, Thomas; Soule, Silas Stillman


Letter, H. O. Wagoner to Wendell Phillips, Esqr.
Authors: Wagoner, Henry O.
Date: November 6, 1859
H.O. Wagoner of Chicago, who had entertained John Brown one afternoon in the fall of 1858, wrote to one of the nation's leading abolitionist supporters of Brown, Wendell Phillips of Boston, Mass., regarding the latter's "oration, delivered in Brooklyn, on the character--facts of history, and circumstances with reference to 'Capt John Brown,' that noblest of God's heroes, who struck the great blow at Harper's Ferry."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Osawatomie, Battle of; Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884; Wagoner, Henry O.


Report, New England Emigrant Aid Company Texan Committee
Authors: Cabot, Samuel ; New England Emigrant Aid Company Texan Committee
Date: March 8, 1860
S[amuel] Cabot submitted a report of the Texan Committee to the New England Emigrant Aid Company Executive Committee. The committee recommended that the Company take action to settle portions of Texas northwest of San Antonio with antislavery advocates as part of the effort to halt the westward advance of slavery. Cabot expressed the committee's view that the only peaceful solution to the slavery issue required demonstrating to slaveholders the superiority of free labor over slave labor; the committee believed West Texas a logical place for this demonstration to occur.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Cabot, Samuel; Emigrant aid companies; New England Emigrant Aid Company; New England Emigrant Aid Company Texan Committee; Settlement; Texas


Letter, Richard J. Hinton to My Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Hinton, R. J.
Date: May 25, 1860
This letter was written by R. J. Hinton to Thaddeus Hyatt while Hyatt was imprisoned in Washington D.C. In the letter, Hinton applauded Hyatt's commitment to the cause of freedom and assured him that his efforts would not be forgotten. It was written on the back of an announcement for a political anti-slavery convention to be held in Boston.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Boston, Massachusetts; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Prisons; United States Government


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