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14 results for Antislavery movements:
Letter, J. Z. Goodrich to Dear Sir
Authors: Goodrich, J. Z.
Date: June 29, 1854
This printed letter, on letterhead from the House of Representatives in Washington, D. C., was written by John Zacheus Goodrich, a representative from Massachusetts. He informed the recipient that members of Congress and regular citizens of the city had formed the Union Emigration Society--these citizens opposed both the repeal of the Missouri Compromise and the opening of the territories to slavery. It included details about the Missouri Compromise, the designs of Slave Power, and stated that "our watchword is Constitutional Freedom everywhere within the jurisdiction of the United States."

Keywords: Antislavery; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Goodrich, J. Z.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Kansas question; Missouri compromise; Nebraska Territory; Sectionalism (United States); Slave power; Slavery; United States. Congress. House


Mass. Emigrant Aid Co. [Plan of Operation]
Authors: Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company
Date: c. 1854
An unidentified author outlined the purpose, benefits, and plan of operation of the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company. The author described the benefits to the emigrants, the country, and the company and listed a six phase plan of operation.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company; New England Emigrant Aid Company


Freedom's Struggle in Kansas
Authors: Snodgrass, J. E.
Date: February 26, 1855
This printed circuletter is addressed "to the Friends of Freedom." In it, J. E. Snodgrass expressed his antislavery sentiments and claimed he knew about slavery first hand as he had been born in the South. He also promoted the activities of the New York Kansas League which he described as a "philanthrophic association" to aid emigration to Kansas. The document also discussed the American Settlement Company which was a "joint stock association" that promoted the settlement of free state supporters at Council City, Kansas Territory (later Burlingame). He closed with antislavery statements and offered to give free lectures on the topic. He was located in New York City at the time the document was printed.

Keywords: American Settlement Company; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Burlingame, Kansas Territory; Council City, Kansas Territory; Free state settlers; Free state support; Free state supporters; New York; New York League; Osage County, Kansas Territory; Snodgrass, J. E.; Town development


Minutes, New England Emigrant Aid Company Annual Meetings
Authors: New England Emigrant Aid Company
Date: March 5, 1855 - May 29, 1860
Proceedings of the New England Emigrant Aid Company stockholders meetings. The meetings typically involved the election of officers, a treasurer's report, consideration of resolutions, and an assessment of the company's prospects in Kansas. The minutes for the first meeting of the New England Emigrant Aid Company (March 5, 1855) included the corporation by-laws.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Higginson, Charles J.; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Minutes; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


An Act to Punish Offences Against Slave Property
Authors: Kansas Territory, Legislature
Date: August 14, 1855
This act was passed by the Legislative Assembly of Kansas Territory on August 14, 1855. It was to take effect on September 15, 1855. The Speaker of the House was J. H. Stringfellow and the President of the Council was Thomas Johnson. The act included a death penalty for persons causing or aiding in any "rebellion or insurrection of slaves, free negroes, or mulattoes" in Kansas Territory. Other provisions dealt with "speaking, writing, or printing" that encouraged slaves to rebel or that argued that the right to hold slaves did not exist in Kansas Territory. Several sections of the act contained penalities for encouraging or assisting slaves to escape and one stated that anyone opposed to the holding of slaves cound not serve on a jury.

Keywords: Abolitionists; African Americans; Antislavery; Antislavery movements; Johnson, Thomas; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Laws; Shawnee Manual Labor School; Slave insurrections; Slavery; Slaves; Stringfellow, John H.


Photograph, John Doy rescue party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son Charles left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859. They were then taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After this trial, his son Charles was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail he was freed by friends from Kansas on September 23, 1859. Two different ambrotypes showing the John Doy rescue party were digitized for the project. When you compared the images, you will find the men are standing in different positions.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Abolitionists; Ambrotypes; Antislavery movements; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Firearms; Free state activities; Free state cause; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Hay, George R.; Photographs and Illustrations; Pike, Joshua A.; Senix, Jacob; Simmons, Thomas; Soule, Silas Stillman


Photograph, John Doy rescue party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son Charles left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859. They were then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After this trial Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail he was freed by friends from Kansas on September 23, 1859. Two different ambrotypes showing the John Doy rescue party were digitized for the project. When you compared the images, you will find the men are standing in different positions.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Abolitionists; Ambrotypes; Antislavery movements; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Firearms; Free state activities; Free state cause; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Hay, George R.; Photographs and Illustrations; Pike, Joshua A.; Senix, Jacob; Simmons, Thomas; Soule, Silas Stillman


Letter, H. O. Wagoner to Wendell Phillips, Esqr.
Authors: Wagoner, Henry O.
Date: November 6, 1859
H.O. Wagoner of Chicago, who had entertained John Brown one afternoon in the fall of 1858, wrote to one of the nation's leading abolitionist supporters of Brown, Wendell Phillips of Boston, Mass., regarding the latter's "oration, delivered in Brooklyn, on the character--facts of history, and circumstances with reference to 'Capt John Brown,' that noblest of God's heroes, who struck the great blow at Harper's Ferry."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Osawatomie, Battle of; Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884; Wagoner, Henry O.


Report, New England Emigrant Aid Company Texan Committee
Authors: Cabot, Samuel ; New England Emigrant Aid Company Texan Committee
Date: March 8, 1860
S[amuel] Cabot submitted a report of the Texan Committee to the New England Emigrant Aid Company Executive Committee. The committee recommended that the Company take action to settle portions of Texas northwest of San Antonio with antislavery advocates as part of the effort to halt the westward advance of slavery. Cabot expressed the committee's view that the only peaceful solution to the slavery issue required demonstrating to slaveholders the superiority of free labor over slave labor; the committee believed West Texas a logical place for this demonstration to occur.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Cabot, Samuel; Emigrant aid companies; New England Emigrant Aid Company; New England Emigrant Aid Company Texan Committee; Settlement; Texas


Letter, Richard J. Hinton to My Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Hinton, R. J.
Date: May 25, 1860
This letter was written by R. J. Hinton to Thaddeus Hyatt while Hyatt was imprisoned in Washington D.C. In the letter, Hinton applauded Hyatt's commitment to the cause of freedom and assured him that his efforts would not be forgotten. It was written on the back of an announcement for a political anti-slavery convention to be held in Boston.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Boston, Massachusetts; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Prisons; United States Government


Letter, L. Maria Child to Dear Mrs. [Mary] Brown
Authors: Child, Lydia Maria Francis , 1802-1880
Date: December 2, 1860
One year after the execution of John Brown, on December 2, 1860, Mrs. Child wrote the Brown's widow, Mary Brown, regarding the impact her husband's actions and commitment to the cause had had on the country and efforts for "emancipation." She also sent along "a trifle" to help support the Brown family financially.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Child, Lydia Maria Francis, 1802-1880; Slavery


Letter, Oliver Brown to Dear Folks
Authors: Brown, Oliver
Date: May 16 [1857?]
From Colinsville, Hartford Co., Connecticut (most likely, May 16, 1857), Oliver Brown wrote to his family regarding his current employer, "Mr. [Charles] Blair," who had agreed to pay Oliver $200, plus room and board, for one year. "Mr. Blair is now at work making 1000 Kansas butter knifes for Father," wrote Oliver Brown. He mentioned the presence of Brown relatives in that area and the favorable "reputation of the family [Browns] in Kansas" reflected among the residents there.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Blair, Charles; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Oliver; Collinsville, Connecticut; Hartford, Connecticut; Weapons (see also Guns)


Photograph, Owen Brown
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Owen Brown was one of John Brown's sons. He, along with his brothers John Jr., Jason, Frederick, and Salmon settled on Pottawatomie Creek near Osawatomie in Miami County, Kansas Territory, in February, 1855.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Owen; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Photographs and Illustrations


Photograph, Salmon P. Chase
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Salmon P. Chase was the Governor of Ohio from 1855 to 1860. As an attorney, he defended fugitive slaves and was active in the antislavery and free soil movements. He later served as Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln. This image was taken later in his life.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Cabinet photographs; Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Free Soil Party; Ohio; Photographs and Illustrations


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.