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25 results for Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood):
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Diary, scattered entries
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: September 10, 1854, through February 7, 1861
The diary entries are very scattered. The first entry indicated that Adair and his wife were considering coming to Kansas. The other entries relate to daily activities and Adair's ministry. He often mentioned who he visited and who was ill. The entry for Feb. 4, 1861, noted that Kansas had been admitted to the Union.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Diaries; Free state activities; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion


Senate Miscellaneous Documents, 34th Congress, 1st and 2nd sessions Document No. 32, Three Memorials of the Citizens of . . .Leavenworth County. . .Praying the immediate admission of Kansas Territory into the Union as a State
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 24, 1856
These "memorials" presented by various citizens or Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory, to the United States Congress and referred by them to the Committee on Territories, were written in a petition style, with the names of supporters signed at their conclusion, and requested the immediate admission of Kansas Territory to the Union under the Constitution framed by the Topeka Legislature. Following the three memorials is a copy of the proposed Constitution, as approved by James Lane and Joel Goodin, respectively President and Secretary of the Topeka Constitutional Convention.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Election fraud; Foster, Charles A.; Free state activities; Goodin, Joel Kishler; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; United States. Congress. Senate


Letter, A. Pierse to Dear Sir [Eli Thayer]
Authors: Pierse, A.
Date: March 31, 1857
A. Pierse wrote from Washington, D.C. to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Pierse was born in North Carolina and lived most of his life in the South but had been living in Minnesota Territory for the past seven years. He told Thayer that he planned to move to Kansas in the spring of 1857. Pierse offered Thayer his opinion on what free state supporters should do in Kansas Territory. He informed Thayer that, although he had "Southern opinions on the subject of slavery" and believed the federal government had no right to prohibit slavery in the territories, he was "without prejudice for or against either side" in the debate over slavery in Kansas Territory. Pierse suggested that the best course for free staters to take would be to accept the Dred Scott decision, actively participate in the political process in Kansas Territory, and work for the admission of Kansas as a state with or without slavery. Once Kansas was admitted, he contended, free state supporters would be on firmer legal ground to advocate for the prohibition of slavery, since it was generally accepted that "the people have the power to prohibit slavery in their state." He concluded by stating that once Kansas was a state, free staters could make the case that property would be worth 3 or 4 times more if slavery was prohibited in the state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Dred Scott decision; Free state prospects; Pierse, A.; Proslavery perspective; Slavery; Southern emigrants; Southerners; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Speech of Senator Douglas, of Illinois, on the President's Message
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: December 9, 1857
Senator Stephen Douglas delivered this speech in the United States Senate, responding to President Buchanan's decision to let Congress determine whether or not to admit Kansas into the Union. Douglas approved of the decision, as he believed it was not an Executive matter. Douglas reiterated the point that the members of the Lecompton Constitutional Convention were appointed to frame a sample government, subject to the approval of the Territory's citizens, not to make a government themselves. Although he disapproved of the means used to submit the Lecompton Constitution to Congress, Douglas judged that the free state government in Topeka was an unlawful legislative body.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election fraud; Free state legislature; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Missouri compromise; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Concurrent Resolutions, New York State Senate, Relative to a Constitution for Kansas
Authors: New York State Senate
Date: January 6, 1858
This resolution proposed to support the creation, by peaceful and just electoral means, of a state constitution in the Kansas Territory. The resolution also suggested that if a constitution could be approved by the voters of the Kansas Territory, that the U. S. Congress accept the territory as a state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Constitutions; Elections; National politics; New York; New York State Senate; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Violence


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