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25 results for Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood):
Diary, scattered entries
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: September 10, 1854, through February 7, 1861
The diary entries are very scattered. The first entry indicated that Adair and his wife were considering coming to Kansas. The other entries relate to daily activities and Adair's ministry. He often mentioned who he visited and who was ill. The entry for Feb. 4, 1861, noted that Kansas had been admitted to the Union.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Diaries; Free state activities; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion


Senate Miscellaneous Documents, 34th Congress, 1st and 2nd sessions Document No. 32, Three Memorials of the Citizens of . . .Leavenworth County. . .Praying the immediate admission of Kansas Territory into the Union as a State
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 24, 1856
These "memorials" presented by various citizens or Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory, to the United States Congress and referred by them to the Committee on Territories, were written in a petition style, with the names of supporters signed at their conclusion, and requested the immediate admission of Kansas Territory to the Union under the Constitution framed by the Topeka Legislature. Following the three memorials is a copy of the proposed Constitution, as approved by James Lane and Joel Goodin, respectively President and Secretary of the Topeka Constitutional Convention.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Election fraud; Foster, Charles A.; Free state activities; Goodin, Joel Kishler; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; United States. Congress. Senate


Letter, A. Pierse to Dear Sir [Eli Thayer]
Authors: Pierse, A.
Date: March 31, 1857
A. Pierse wrote from Washington, D.C. to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Pierse was born in North Carolina and lived most of his life in the South but had been living in Minnesota Territory for the past seven years. He told Thayer that he planned to move to Kansas in the spring of 1857. Pierse offered Thayer his opinion on what free state supporters should do in Kansas Territory. He informed Thayer that, although he had "Southern opinions on the subject of slavery" and believed the federal government had no right to prohibit slavery in the territories, he was "without prejudice for or against either side" in the debate over slavery in Kansas Territory. Pierse suggested that the best course for free staters to take would be to accept the Dred Scott decision, actively participate in the political process in Kansas Territory, and work for the admission of Kansas as a state with or without slavery. Once Kansas was admitted, he contended, free state supporters would be on firmer legal ground to advocate for the prohibition of slavery, since it was generally accepted that "the people have the power to prohibit slavery in their state." He concluded by stating that once Kansas was a state, free staters could make the case that property would be worth 3 or 4 times more if slavery was prohibited in the state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Dred Scott decision; Free state prospects; Pierse, A.; Proslavery perspective; Slavery; Southern emigrants; Southerners; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Speech of Senator Douglas, of Illinois, on the President's Message
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: December 9, 1857
Senator Stephen Douglas delivered this speech in the United States Senate, responding to President Buchanan's decision to let Congress determine whether or not to admit Kansas into the Union. Douglas approved of the decision, as he believed it was not an Executive matter. Douglas reiterated the point that the members of the Lecompton Constitutional Convention were appointed to frame a sample government, subject to the approval of the Territory's citizens, not to make a government themselves. Although he disapproved of the means used to submit the Lecompton Constitution to Congress, Douglas judged that the free state government in Topeka was an unlawful legislative body.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election fraud; Free state legislature; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Missouri compromise; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Concurrent Resolutions, New York State Senate, Relative to a Constitution for Kansas
Authors: New York State Senate
Date: January 6, 1858
This resolution proposed to support the creation, by peaceful and just electoral means, of a state constitution in the Kansas Territory. The resolution also suggested that if a constitution could be approved by the voters of the Kansas Territory, that the U. S. Congress accept the territory as a state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Constitutions; Elections; National politics; New York; New York State Senate; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Violence


Letter, T. J. Robinson to Governor [James W. Denver]
Authors: Robinson, Thomas J.
Date: March 3, 1858
Thomas J. Robinson, writing from Washington D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, speculated that Kansas would be admitted as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Robinson suggested that Denver's future political prospects would improve from such an occurrence.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Herndon, Lou; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Thomas J.; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Town promotion


Letter, Jo. P. Vaughn to Genl. [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Vaughn, John P.
Date: March 4, 1858
John P. Vaughn, writing from Sacramento, California to Governor James W. Denver, about his efforts to get the California legislature to support Kansas' admission as a state under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Vaughn, John P.


Speech of Hon. James H. Hammond of South Carolina on the Admission of Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.

Keywords: Adams, Zu; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Business enterprises; Hammond, James H.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; South Carolina; Southerners; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Territorial government


Speech of Hon. R.M.T. Hunter, of Virginia, on the Admission of the State of Kansas
Authors: Hunter, Robert M. T.
Date: March 12, 1858
Senator Robert M.T. Hunter delivered this speech on the floor of the Senate in support of adopting Kansas into statehood under the Lecompton Constitution. Hunter argued that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention had been formed under the consent and election of the people of Kansas, not as an instrument of the Territorial Government. He also stated that those accused of being "foreign" Missouri voters were nothing more than settlers who had staked their claims in the fall of 1857 and left them to return the following spring. Hunter added that it would have been impossible to ascertain the true will of the people if the entire Lecompton Constitution would have been put to a vote, as it would be unlikely that voters would approve or disapprove of every single provision it might include. Ultimately, Hunter believed that "white men should have the continent, not as equals of the Indians or the negros, but as their masters."

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Hunter, Robert M.T.; Virginia


Letter, Brad [A. G. Bradford] to [Governor James H.] Denver
Authors: Bradford, A. G.
Date: March 18, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James H. Denver, suggested that the effort to admit Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution likely would fail in the U.S. Congress. Bradford also sought Denver's support for his attempt to receive an appointment as Superintendent of Indian Affairs and commented upon Denver's future political opportunities in California.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bradford, A. G.; Calhoun, John; California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Patronage, political; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Brad. [A. J. Bradford] to [Governor James W.] Denver
Authors: Bradford, A. G.
Date: April 1, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported upon the U.S. House of Representative's passage of the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, which proposed to resubmit the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Bradford predicted, however, that a House-Senate conference committee would endorse the Senate's version of the Lecompton Constitution bill, which proposed the admission of Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Bradford added that he believed both houses of Congress would agree to admit Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bradford, A. G.; California; Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863; Lecompton Constitution; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); United States. Congress


Minutes, First Meeting of Territorial Central Committee of the Free State Party
Authors: Free State Executive Committee
Date: September 23, 1858
The first meeting of the Free State Party's territorial central committee was convened in Lawrence on September 23, 1858, with, according to the minutes, the following individuals in attendance: James Blood, temporary chair; P. H. Townsend; W. F. M. Arny, and James M. Winchell, along with J. C. Douglas who held proxy for John McKee. Among other things, the committee resolved to nominate Samuel W. Greer for territorial superintendent of public instruction.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Blood, James; Free State Convention; Free State Party; Greer, Samuel Wiley; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Minutes; Political conventions; Superintendent of Public Instruction; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877


Letter, A. H. Reeder to Dear Sir [Franklin Crane]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: November 28, 1859
Andrew Reeder, former governor of Kansas Territory, wrote from Easton, Pennsylvania to Dr. Franklin Crane of Topeka. The letter discussed business interests in Kansas and prospects for Kansas's admission to the union. Reeder also suggested that it might be beneficial to replace place names established by the bogus legislature, which had pro slavery connections.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bogus legislature; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 20, 1860
Charles Robinson wrote several letters to his wife in Lawrence as he traveled East in January 1860. From the Astor House, New York, on January 20, he wrote that Congress was not yet in session and that everyone expected the Democrats to oppose Kansas admission. It was possible that Robinson could "be sent for as a witness in Harpers Ferry affair" (Congressional investigation/hearings).

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; New York; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); United States. Congress


Letter, R. G. Elliott to Dear Sister
Authors: Elliott, Robert G.
Date: January 24, 1860
Robert Elliott, former publisher of the Kansas Free State newspaper, wrote to his sister from Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Elliott told her that the Territorial legislature had just began its session, and he explained how it came to be held in Lawrence. He updated his sister on his current occupation as a Deputy at the Treasurer's office and cleared up a rumor that he had received $40,000 compensation for damages during the sack of Lawrence. He had only received $4,000, and he had immediately invested it in Territorial land warrants.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Elliott, Robert G.; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Pikes Peak gold rush; Real estate investment; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Telegraph


Letter, W. A. Phillips to S. N. Wood
Authors: Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893
Date: January 29, 1860
William A. Phillips was snow bound in Salina and wrote to encourage Wood to look after Salina's interests in the legislature. He was especially concerned about the potential effort by men from Junction City to promote their town at the expense of Salina, through the acquisition of "special legislative privileges." Phillips specifically mentioned the development of the "Pikes Peak road"--"I would rather nothing was done with any Pikes Peak road, or stage route this way, unless it is to be controlled by good reliable men, and not a cabal at Junction City." He expressed concern also about legislative actions that would allow a monopoly on bridge building, railroad charters and the location of such roads, and post offices.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Dickinson County, Kansas Territory; Economic development; Junction City, Kansas Territory; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Pikes Peak road, Kansas Territory; Railroads; Reynolds, Robert; Salina, Kansas Territory; Saline County, Kansas Territory; Solomon, Kansas Territory; Town promotion; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to A. J. Isacks
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: March 22, 1860
Ewing addressed a number of issues in this letter to former territorial Kansas attorney general Andrew J. Isacks (1854-1857), who was in Washington, D.C. presumably lobbying Congress on behalf of Kansas admission, etc., but closed with some interesting comments on Leavenworth's interest in the promotion and development of the Smoky Hill route to the Pikes Peak region. Isacks was one of Ewing's principle partners in the Leavenworth, Pawnee, & Western Railroad venture and was undoubtedly busy lobbying for a railroad land grant from Congress.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Colorado City, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Homestead law; Isacks, Andrew Jackson; Land grants; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western Railroad Company; Pikes Peak gold rush; Railroads; Smoky Hill Trail, Kansas Territory; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, R. S. Stevens to S. N. Wood
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 2, 1860
R. S. Stevens, a Democratic attorney who had a variety of financial interests in Kansas during the 1850s and 1860s, wrote this letter to Wood from Washington, D.C., where he (Stevens) seemed to be lobbying for a number of concessions for himself and Kansas Territory. Specifically, he wrote of mail routes and "grants for R Rr" [railroads], which would not be forthcoming because of the Republicans who "care[d] nothing about us [Kansas] except so far as political capital can be made." Much of the letter is a condemnation of the Republican Party, which he also wrote was holding up Kansas admission so it could be used against the Democrats, and the final page addressed action, or inaction, with regard to Indian treaties and land.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic National Convention (1860 : Charleston, S.C.); Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Indian lands; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Railroads; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Stevens, Robert S.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte Constitution


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to S. N. Wood
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: April 17, 1860
From Washington, D.C., Pomeroy wrote to express his concern for the Woods who had just lost their "'House & Effect'" in a fire. But as consolation Pomeroy informed Wood that Kansas was "going to be admitted 'into the family of States,' this season." Then, making reference to the 1856 dispersal of the Topeka free state legislature, Pomeroy wrote: "I wonder if our State Legislature could not be called together at Topeka upon the 4th of July, to commemorate the day of our being 'dispersed' by the United States Soldiers!!" Although optimistic, Pomeroy conceded politics might still hold up admission, if the anti-Seward forces thought Kansas votes might influence the decision of the upcoming Chicago convention.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Atchison, Kansas Territory; Deitzler, George W.; Democratic Party (U.S.); Fires; Free state legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; United States. Congress


Letter, S. [Sara Robinson] to "My Dearly loved Husband" [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: May 7, 1860
Another very personal letter from Sara in Lawrence to Charles back East. She wrote mostly of mundane matters but does mention speculation about Kansas admission and the Charleston convention.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [Hon. John J. Crittenden]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: June 5, 1860
In this letter to Kentucky Senator John J. Crittenden, Ewing urged support for the pending Kansas bill, which would have brought Kansas into the Union under the Wyandotte Constitution, by explaining one potentially controversial provision and assuring the senator that the population of the territory was between 80,000 and 100,000. The constitution provision in question conferred "suffrage on aliens who have declared their intention to become citizens of the United States." Ewing did not argue "the wisdom of this provision" but explained that it was a necessary "inducement to Emigrants" being made by all the western states and territories.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Census; Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Immigrants; Kentucky; Suffrage; United States. Congress. Senate; Wyandotte Constitution


John A. Halderman to Eds. of the Constitution
Authors: Halderman, John Adams
Date: June 6, 1860
While in Washington, D. C., Halderman followed the congressional debate regarding Kansas admission and informed the "Constitution" that Senator [Louis T.] Wigfall, a Texas firebrand, had reportedly "assailed the character of the people of Kansas Territory". Halderman regretted that, since he was not "privileged" to take the floor of either house, he could not officially denounce these "unwarranted accusations" and feared if he and others were silent they might be accepted as truth.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Halderman, John Adams; Texas; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.; Wigfall, Louis T. (Louis Trezevant), 1816-1874


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 7, 1860
From Washington, D.C., December 7, 1860, Charles Robinson wrote his wife regarding the likelihood of secession and the government's response should this happen. He expected Kansas to be admitted to the Union, perhaps as soon as some of the Southern states withdrew their members from the Senate, and also believe the chances were good that Congress would authorize payment of Kansas' claims against the government for damages--such payments would provide some help for those presently in need of relief assistance.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Railroad land grants; Relief; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Secession; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; United States. Congress


Letter, Lyman Trumbull to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Trumbull, Lyman , 1813-1896
Date: December 14, 1860
U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull, an Illinois supporter of A. Lincoln's and long-time acquaintance of Delahay, wrote from Washington, D.C., to thank the Kansan for his efforts in the recent campaign. The senator hoped his friend would be rewarded by his fellow citizens; "It would give me sincere pleasure to see you in the Senate from the new State of Kansas . . ." Trumbull also commented on secession crisis, the failures of the Buchanan administration, and the absolute necessity for the government to resist the withdrawal of states from the Union.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Buchanan administration; Delahay, Mark W.; Illinois; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Secession; South Carolina; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: January 19, 1861
In Lawrence on January 19, 1861, attending the meeting of what proved to be the last territorial legislature, Ingalls wrote about everyone's interest in happenings outside the territory: namely, congressional action on the "Kansas Admission Bill" and the "Pacific Rail Road Bill," as well as "the condition of affairs of the South ['the secession movement']. Especially bad weather--"the snow is quite deep and the temperature below zero constantly"--had left Kansas somewhat isolated, and as they waited for news the legislature was "not doing much except discussing Union resolutions, endorsing Major [Robert] Anderson [commander of U.S. troops at Fort Sumter], and divorcing Every body that applies for rupture of the bonds of matrimony."

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Anderson, Major Robert; Divorce; Divorce law and legislation; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lawrence; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Secession; Sectionalism (United States)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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