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55 results for Abolitionists:
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Quindaro Desk
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856-1861
Walnut desk used by abolitionist Fielding Johnson in Quindaro, Kansas. The word "Quindaro" is painted on the back of the desk. The town of Quindaro was settled by anti-slavery activists. Johnson, a merchant and agent to the Delaware Indians, was known to aid fugitive slaves.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Daily life; Delaware Indians; Fugitive slaves; Furniture; House furnishings; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Johnson, Fielding; Merchants; Objects; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Settlement; Underground railroad; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Resolution, Democratic Party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
This resolution seems to be responding to the history of accusations of election fraud on the part of the proslavery voters, claiming that the recent Democratic election loss was due to the "importation of Abolitionists, many of who perjured themselves by falsely swearing that they were legal voters". Also resolved was that Governor Walker's collaboration with the Abolitionists and free soilers be rebuked, and that men from the Southern states have equal property rights with those of the North. The Democrats also documented their support for the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free soil; Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Proslavery support; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, E. B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: February 20, 1858
This rather lengthy report from Lawrence addressed many issues, especially those surrounding the Lecompton constitutional controversy. With "the Topeka Movement . . . abandoned," the question was what would take its place to resist the Lecompton Constitution if it were accepted by the Congress. The territorial legislature had formally "protested against the admission of Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution," and "the Mass of the people are determined" to resist its imposition. Whitman went on to make many other interesting observations about the political situation, regarding Democrats and Republicans and even abolitionists: "men who seek here and now, on this issue, to break the back bone of slavery forever." In addition to the political, Whitman described his "labor of distributing the clothing . . . for the relief of Kansas," and discussed in some detail the financial situation regarding the Committee, his personal debt, and Kansas relief and support to John Brown.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Buchanan administration; Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state support; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Fred. Douglass to My dear Friend [John Brown]
Authors: Douglass, Frederick , 1818-1895
Date: February 27, 1858
This brief letter from the prominent African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass simply sought to change a Philadelphia meeting date between Douglass and Brown from March 5 to March 10.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895; Philadelpia, Pennsylvania


Letter, Henry Thompson and Ruth [Brown] Thompson to Dear Father [John Brown]
Authors: Thompson, Ruth (Brown); Thompson, Henry
Date: April 21, 1858
From their home at North Elba, New York, April 21, 1858, Henry and Ruth (Brown) Thompson wrote separate letters to "Father," John Brown. Henry Thompson assured his father-in-law that he would leave home immediately and reengage in the "enterprise" but for his obligations to his wife and three children. Ruth simply asked her father not to blame her for Henry's decision not to go with Brown: "I should like to have him go with you if I could feel that he would live to come back."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Owen, 1771-1856; Free state cause; Thompson, Henry; Thompson, Ruth (Brown)


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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.